wired in smoke alarms renewal

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    wired in smoke alarms renewal

    Do the wired in smoke alarms have to be replaced by law after a certain time,even if they still work so as not to negate your landlords insurance/

    #2
    How do you know that they will work, tomorrow, when you have the fire? Testing only proves that they work (pass the test) at the time of the test.

    I don't believe there is any specific legislation about replacement intervals. However, the book would probably get thrown at you if there were a serious fire and they were past the manufacturer's replacement date.

    Most smoke alarms are for safety of life, not to protect the property, so I'm not sure it would make that much difference to the insurance, but you would have to ask the insurers to be sure.

    The Smoke and Carbon Monoxide Alarms Regulations only require them to be in working order at the start of the tenancy. The Regulatory Reform (Fire Safety) Order, just says you need to follow a s suitable system of maintenance and ensure they are in working order. (Failing to replace the heads every 10 years might well constitute a failure to follow a suitable system, if the book were being thrown.)

    Comment


      #3
      Moderator: This needs merging with https://forums.landlordzone.co.uk/fo...n-smoke-alarms

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
        How do you know that they will work, tomorrow, when you have the fire? Testing only proves that they work (pass the test) at the time of the test.
        Actually testing doesn't prove they work at the time of the test either. It just tests that the battery is OK and that the beep is able to beep.

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          #5
          AND the batteries want changing every 2 years ( alkaline / carbon-zinc batteries )

          lithium batteries every 9 years.

          Leaseholders will protest at buying lithium batteries at twice / 3 times the price of normal 9v batteries.


          Internet quote.
          Alkaline batteries
          and lithium batteries are suitable for 9V smoke alarms and other 9V products.
          The 10 year long life lithium batteries last up to 5
          times longer than alkaline batteries and up to 10 times longer than carbon-zinc batteries.

          Comment


            #6
            If a communal alarm is needed at all (they should only be used if the building is deficient), they should not use batteries except to tide them over mains failures. (If one is really needed, you are likely to need a central control panel.)

            With my previous personal smoke alarm, I tried lithium batteries, but got an immediate low battery alarm, so had to revert to alkaline. The alarm manufacturers say those should be changed every year, not every two years.

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              #7
              Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post

              Actually testing doesn't prove they work at the time of the test either. It just tests that the battery is OK and that the beep is able to beep.
              The circuitry is designed to check rather more than just that, although it obviously doesn't start an actual fire. E.g. this optical smoke detector ASIC self test increases the detector sensitivity to generate a deliberate false alarm: http://www.mouser.com/ds/2/268/22180A-79124.pdf (In general only a small number of different ASICs will be used, most differences between brands are likely to be mainly cosmetic.)

              A professionally maintained system would actually be annually tested with simulated smoke: https://www.safelincs.co.uk/aerosol-...etector-tester

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                #8
                Thnk you all for your comments

                Comment


                  #9
                  just go to each property and make some toast... seems to confirm smoke alarms are working in pretty much every flat in our building!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Modern smoke detectors are designed to be less sensitive to toast. False alarms are just as much a failure of a smoke detector as failing to go off in a fire, as they cause the alarm to be ignored, or even diabled.

                    The ones that were most sensitive to toast where the ionisation types (the one with the radiation symbols). The more preferred, but more expensive, modern option is a combination of optical and heat technologies. The optical part detects slow burning and the heat, is more for fast fires. Generally the heat part increases the sensitivity of the optical part, so a fire that affects both will trigger the alarm even when the individual effects wouldn't.

                    If you are getting toast detections, the detector is either too close to the kitchen, or unsuitable for the job, and needs to be repositioned, or replaced, because of the false alarm issue.

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                      #11
                      thanks... I should have added a winking smiley to my post.

                      Where I live, no one is going to do anything about a faulty smoke detector. It's one of the privileges of living in a foreign culture!

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