Flat- which fixtures/fittings covered by insurance?

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    Flat- which fixtures/fittings covered by insurance?

    If there was a fire in one of my flats I wonder how much of the interior is insured under the building insurance policy ?
    The fitted kitchen & bath/sink perhaps etc, but what about carpets & curtains & decorations ?
    Do any of you have contents insurance on your BTL's to cover for this ?
    cheers

    #2
    Originally posted by Pobinr View Post
    If there was a fire in one of my flats I wonder how much of the interior is insured under the building insurance policy ?
    The fitted kitchen & bath/sink perhaps etc, but what about carpets & curtains & decorations ?
    You wonder? Your insurance policy schedule will tell you exactly what it covers.

    Comment


      #3
      Would your insurance cover providing alternative for your tenants whilst they are homeless?

      Does it cover you against any damage they do to themselves and claim against you?
      The contents of this note are neither advice nor a definitive answer. If you plan to rely on this, you should pay somebody for proper advice.

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by Pobinr View Post
        If there was a fire in one of my flats I wonder how much of the interior is insured under the building insurance policy ?
        If it's building insurance, I would imagine it insures the building. The carpets are not part of the building --- in fact I would question whether the fitted kitchen is part of the building either.

        As Eric says; surely you haven't bought an insurance policy without establishing what it covers?

        Peter

        Comment


          #5
          Hi,

          Buildings insurance usually covers your fitted kitchen and sanitary ware in the bathrooms, carpets and other soft furnishings would be covered by contents insurance. Its best to check the very small print on your policy though, as each policy can differ.

          However i'm not sure how you would stand getting contents cover, as far as i know, only one policy can be held per property, so if you were to insure your contents, then it would mean that your tenant would not be able to hold their own contents policy.

          HTH

          Jo

          Comment


            #6
            Hi there,

            As a landlord insurer this is always a bit tricky to explain but here is a simple explanation:

            Buildings is classed as the building itself, anything permantly fitted to it (bathroom suite, fitted kitchen, etc) and things such as your outbuildings, walls, etc.

            Contents is anything that can be removed from the property so curtains, furniture, kitchen items such as fridge, washing machine, etc (unless they are part of a fitted kitchen) and so on.

            The normal and tricky exception to this rule is flooring. Carpets are normally contents even though you would not think of them as removable even though you could pull them up and take them out of the house(?!). Laminate flooring is the most difficult to define and depending on what type of laminate you have may decide whether building or contents.


            Each insurer define their buildings and contents differently. Some may even provide some level of contents cover as standard under the buildings. I know a couple of the companies we use define flooring and curtains as contents (as expected) but provide cover for these two items under their standard building policy as an freebie. Contents cover is only then taken out if other contents items need to be covered (very handy as most landlords just want their buildings, carpets and curtains covered ).

            Going back to your original question, I am only giving a general outline. Look in the front/back cover of your policy book for definitions to see what your current insurer classes as building and contents. If you only want carpets and curtains and it is not included on your current policy perhaps shop around for a policy that throws in these for free? If you want to cover contents above and beyond just carpets and curtains then consider taking out a building and contents combined policy.
            Steve Smith - Company Director at a leading Landlord Insurance broker with 20+ years experience in the industry
            LandlordZONE Verified Poster and Topic Expert for Landlords Insurance since 2009
            See my profile for contact details

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by jo1529 View Post
              Hi,

              Buildings insurance usually covers your fitted kitchen and sanitary ware in the bathrooms, carpets and other soft furnishings would be covered by contents insurance. Its best to check the very small print on your policy though, as each policy can differ.

              However i'm not sure how you would stand getting contents cover, as far as i know, only one policy can be held per property, so if you were to insure your contents, then it would mean that your tenant would not be able to hold their own contents policy.

              HTH

              Jo
              ...and to answer your query Jo, there is no rule on one policy per property. The only rule as such is that the same item/object/property can only be insured once.

              The landlord taking out a landlords contents policy is only insuring their contents (carpets, curtains, furniture, etc). The tenant taking out a standard/tenants contents policy is covering their own contents (clothes, personal possessions, etc). Neither of the two policies can cover the others contents so both should be in place for total protection for both parties (although it is both the tenants/landlords own decision as it is their own risk they are covering).
              Steve Smith - Company Director at a leading Landlord Insurance broker with 20+ years experience in the industry
              LandlordZONE Verified Poster and Topic Expert for Landlords Insurance since 2009
              See my profile for contact details

              Comment


                #8
                [QUOTE=ashburnham;66165] The only rule as such is that the same item/object/property can only be insured once.

                QUOTE]

                Almost, you can infact insure something 20 times over if you wish, however, you could only CLAIM once. Besides it would be a waste of money.

                The quick way to decide if an item comes under buildings or contents is this.
                If it is nailed down, screwed down, bolted down or glued down and you wouldn't take it with you if you moved, then the chances are it is buildings.

                Just about everything else should be contents ( but as always, read your policy document for full details of cover )

                Comment


                  #9
                  Thank you for your replies. Particularly yours Ashburnham.
                  The reason I asked is my 14 properties are all flats so the managing agents have the policies so a general rule of thumb is helpful to save many enquires.
                  My flats are unfurnished apart from fridge & cooker supplied. So in the event of a fire Id' have to supply new ones of those & possibly carpets, curtains & even possibly pay out for new laminate floors unless I take out contents insurance. No doubt there are landlord policies that cover loss of rent but on 14 properties that's going to be rather dear & time consuming to set up. Perhaps I'll self insure on that. As some cover floors & others not I think I need to contact the managing agents to learn which ones don't.
                  I must have had a premonition !
                  Ironically yesterday I got a call from a concerned neighbour next to one of my properties. The 18 year old son of the tenant had gone to sleep & left a pan of oil heating on the cooker which must have caught fire. The smoke alarm battery had been removed at some point by them. If the neighbour hadn't fortunately seen the smoke coming from a slightly open window & called the fire brigade he probably would have died. Instead he was taken to hospital suffering from smoke inhalation !
                  There is just some black carbon soot marks on the kitchen walls.
                  The fire brigade recommended lithium battery alarms with 10 year battery life & where it's difficult for any foolish tenant to remove the permanently fitted battery. They are going to supply me with two of those alarms for free for the property & have a talk to the tenants & myself about fire safety.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    No doubt there are landlord policies that cover loss of rent but on 14 properties that's going to be rather dear & time consuming to set up.
                    Absolutely fine and sensible if the 14 are in 14 separate buildings; not so good if all in one building.
                    The contents of this note are neither advice nor a definitive answer. If you plan to rely on this, you should pay somebody for proper advice.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      this is a technical question

                      Not all policies are the same ! Please check with a an award winning broker
                      specialist@deliteinsurance.co.uk
                      Neil NEW direct dial 0208 8509697
                      email

                      Comment

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