Payment of Rent

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    Originally posted by CharlesT View Post
    Again thanks to all for useful info. Artful Dodger - .....
    Lodger not dodger - I don't dodge.

    Serious point, detail matters in LL/Tenant matters especially paperwork!

    The only time I issued an s8 (er.. well , equivalent in Scotland) was when there had been a history of delayed payments.. A week or so, rather too regular. One "s8" notice issued, thereafter always on time-in full.

    It's surprising how many letting agents and "gurus" will tell you (pre-covid rules) that an s8 may only be served when there are two month's rent owing. Not so, s8g10 may be served if only 1p is underpaid for only 1 day. And only costs paper & a stamp.

    ... then there was the case of a Doctor I'd rented a house to (same Scottish house, views of mountains & sea lochs.. ), I was v busy at work, very nicely paid thank you, living hundreds of miles away, not bothering or bothered to check my bank accounts: After some time I looked: No payments, for more than 6 months, since initial month's rent and deposit. Both I and Doctor had (genuinely I think ) forgotten. Very prompt payment from Doc after I politely queried matters.. Model tenant, he went on to promising career.

    A lesson to us all.....

    Best wishes to all. Stay safe!

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    Lash thank you for your reply which prompts me to hang in with my current application albeit I have had no formal confirmation it has been received. I am having similar experiences with lots of contact with DWP/Housing offices which promise action; but with achingly slow responses. CBT

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    Oops, fingers again. Negotiations with the tenant always promised improvement; but Covid really brought that all to a halt. So current position is outcone of current application for direct payment awaited before property goes on the market hopefully with a regular rent record. My other two properties have thankfully already a regular rent payers in situ.
    CharlesT

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    Again thanks to all for useful info. Artful Dodger - apologies for my sarcasm in my reply to you. I should have said it was 18 months ago that non payment first started. There were sporadic payments in the period up to and into the Covid lockdown. Negotiations with the tenant

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  • Lash
    replied
    My request was eventually successful but took many phone calls to prompt A response from DWP. I pushed for at least an acknowledgement that my request had been received, as it should be, from DWPs own guidance. A landlord referral was sent to UC, after many calls from me, which eventually led to a decision and input of the APA. The process took about 6 weeks.


    MPTL

    ALTERNATIVE PAYMENT ARRANGEMENT




    Disclosure of information to landlords

    Any Managed Payment to Landlord (MPTL) can be applied to a claim without the need for the explicit consent of the claimant.

    Once a MPTL has been set up, the following information can be shared with the landlord:

    · that the MPTL has been applied to the claim

    · the value of any amount paid to the landlord and the period this covers.

    We should confirm receipt of a MPTL request to a landlord once it has been received, but can share no further information unless a MPTL is applied.

    Once the request has been processed the landlord will be advised of the outcome. If the request is refused, the Department cannot tell the landlord the specific reason why because of data sharing regulations and claimant confidentiality. Instead, a range of potential reasons why a request has been denied will be provided.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    Unqualified yes, in some things.

    Thank you for your kind words.

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    My post asked for information on how successful others have been in applying for direct payment; but thank you for your unqualified advice.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    18 months since rent started not to be paid? You could have served s21 and s8 within a day or so.

    A lesson to us all.

    Leave a comment:


  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    What's that last sentence again?

    I'd be issuing S21 and S8. No rent, no stay. At the moment there are plenty of people wanting properties, at least where I am, and it seems to be everywhere.

    How many male partners did she have living there, just as a matter of interest? Are they on the tenancy agreement? Can you chase them for arrears?

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    Oops, finger trouble. - local welfare offices say they they are aware; but painfully slow to reach decisions. I just wondered if others had similar long delays in successful completion of direct payment application. CharlesT

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  • CharlesT
    replied
    Thank you all for the comments. To clarify the background -
    the tenant was paying rent at the outset of the tenancy and also paying an agreed extra amount to pay of earlier arrears. Contact was always good until 18 months ago when rent payments stopped. Letters, emails and visits have all been unproductive. Tenant keeps prooerty in decent condition. 3 children in residence. Male partners are absent so this sinhle mother is dependent on UC support. Local social welfare offices are on the case re my application for direct rental paymentdld; but whilst

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  • Jon66
    replied
    Yes providing you fulfill the published criteria you should be fine getting direct payments. Re the arrears the amount will depend upon whether UC or HB.

    UC arrears can be 20 per cent of the standard allowance.
    Single and under 25 £342.72
    Single and 25 or over £409.89
    In a couple and you're both under 25 £488.59
    In a couple and either of you are 25 or over £594.04
    For housing benefit to my knowledge there is no system for paying off arrears. However, the tenant can apply for discretionary housing payment to pay off the arrears, which can be a one off payment.

    There are also local government funds for the same, so it's worth helping your tenant to make an application for these, they aren't well publicised because they are limited. Having just entered the new financial year, it's a good time to apply. Different local authorities use different teams to administer these, but if there's a welfare rights worker or debt management worker at the local authority they would be worth contacting, or if not, the homeless team.
    Last edited by Jon66; 14-04-2021, 10:56 AM. Reason: If housing benefit to my knowledge ther e is no system for paying arrears.

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  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    I doubt you'll get the arears cleared.

    I assume you've written to the tenant asking for the arrears to be cleared. I'd write again giving them 14 days notice to clear the arrears. then after the 14 days give another 7 days. I'd write tot he council explaining the situation ie that they're in arrears and is there any help they can give the tenant as the tenant is making themselves potentially homeless by not paying their rent. This way the council will know they are making themselves 'intentionally homeless' and if they're like my council will not house them.

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  • theartfullodger
    replied
    It is the tenant who owes rent, not any benefits authority. Take action against tenant, inform benefits authority (whichever one) that you will evict asap unless arrears cleared.

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  • jpkeates
    replied
    The processes for Universal Credit and housing benefit are different.

    Neither will pay any arrears (beyond a possible tiny weekly payment).
    You might be able to get a one off payment if the alternative is eviction, but that’s more theoretical than likely.

    Leave a comment:

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