No DSS?

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    No DSS?

    I'll just post this without comment, for now.

    W & P Select committee inquiry into 'No DSS'.

    They want to hear from both tenants and landlords.

    https://www.parliament.uk/business/c...-letter-17-19/

    #2
    This seems to be gathering pace ahead of the inquiry.

    Zoopla have this morning announced that they will bar 'No DSS' advertising:
    https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-47567568

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      #3
      Oh, well, then we'll just go through the charade of showing properties to even more people we have no intention of letting to.

      Comment


        #4
        I've not had any DSS tenants since 2001....
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depart...United_Kingdom)

        Artful: In receipt of 6 benefits, thank you!
        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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          #5
          Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
          I've not had any DSS tenants since 2001....
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depart...United_Kingdom)

          Artful: In receipt of 6 benefits, thank you!

          Had this discussion with a local estate agent via facebook a few weeks back where they were posting that they would consider DSS tenants for any property (as they had now across the board removed the 'NO DSS' entry on all adverts and contracts... Pointed out that one of the parties would need a time machine. They didnt get it to start with but with a bit of guidance (and the link you posted) they worked out just how out of date their wording was!

          We have had a number of tenants through our properties, and to date the best 2 families have both had benefits of some sorts. Dont see what the problem is (other than the council being a pain to deal with)

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            #6
            TBH it will make no difference, apart from removing it from mortgage terms and advertising.

            Landlords will still be able to have a 'no benefits' poilicy, they just won't be able to advertise it as such.
            ("Would Suit Working Person/Couple" is the easy way round that one, it gives your intention without actually barring anyone).

            Even if legislation was put in place to stop landlords having such a policy there would be no easy way of enforcing it.

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              #7
              Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
              I've not had any DSS tenants since 2001....
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depart...United_Kingdom)
              The DSS never paid housing benefits - I'd guess people are mixing it up with the DHSS.
              By the time the DSS was created, housing benefits had become the responsibility of local authorities.

              One issue that I have is that some of the same people who want to make it illegal to discriminate against people on benefits are the same people who support punitive benefits sanctions, universal credit and lower than stupid levels of housing allowance.
              Which are some of the main reasons landlords don't want tenants on benefits.

              If landlords could receive regular rent at reasonable levels direct from the state, tenants on benefits would be possibly more appealing than a working tenant.
              No one ever got made redundant from being poor.
              When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
              Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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                #8
                Originally posted by sam_cat View Post

                We have had a number of tenants through our properties, and to date the best 2 families have both had benefits of some sorts.
                In recent years, what has been your percentage of arrears of non benefit claimant tenants compared to those claiming benefits?

                Dont see what the problem is
                They are higher risk.*

                It doesn't have to be that way, as the man says;

                "If landlords could receive regular rent at reasonable levels direct from the state, tenants on benefits would be possibly more appealing than a working tenant."

                Unless that changes, it is an obvious business decision.

                *If anyone is really interested, have a sift through the MoJ possession statistics.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by boletus View Post
                  In recent years, what has been your percentage of arrears of non benefit claimant tenants compared to those claiming benefits?
                  Statistically insignificant numbers (3 properties) and difference in arrears, but the benefit claimants seem to look after the place better and are far more approachable. Although the most recent professional couple were a nightmare to deal with and left the place in a state, which may have jaded my opinion!

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