Can I refuse to renew a rental agreement?

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    Can I refuse to renew a rental agreement?

    I own a small HMO. There are two couples and a single guy. One couple is always arguing with the other couple about everything and they just can't get on. One tenancy agreement end on 31st of july. Can I refuse to renew the agreement and ask them to leave at the end of the agreement? Please help

    #2
    You have to give formal notice (S21) and now is not a great time to evict anyone due to pandemic and the resulting restrictions on evictions. With no action, the tenancy will become periodic.

    I had one tenant causing a problem in a house some time ago and I evicted him. It ended up being an expensive decision due to the resulting void, but it was the right one. The remaining tenants were happier once he had gone.

    It would seem advisable to discuss the situation with the tenants in question if you can. Perhaps they will see that it is not working and will be amenable to leaving of their own accord?
    There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

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      #3
      Originally posted by emgruk@yahoo.co.uk View Post
      Can I refuse to renew the agreement and ask them to leave at the end of the agreement? Please help
      You can refuse to renew the agreement, but that doesn't mean they have to leave (a new tenancy will be created automatically).

      To get someone to leave if they don't want to, you'll need to serve notice and may have to go to court to enforce it.

      Isn't landlord training part of your local authorities licensing scheme - that's a pretty basic misunderstanding?

      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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        #4
        Thank you for your replies. We don't get any training at all and we are only doing this landlord thing by chance, so we don't really know much. It seems quite unfair that a tenant can decide to go but a landlord cannot ask them to go at the end of a term. Everybody would definitely be much happier if they went.

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          #5
          It seems unusual to be operating an HMO by chance. But anyway, be aware that HMOs are not entry-level landlord stuff and you really need to know what you are doing. (This is true of letting any property, but all the more so with an HMO.)
          There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

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            #6
            Originally posted by emgruk View Post
            Thank you for your replies. We don't get any training at all and we are only doing this landlord thing by chance, so we don't really know much.
            No one runs an HMO by chance.
            It's like "accidentally" becoming a rally driver because you own a car.

            The implications of running an HMO without knowing what you're doing are serious.

            I'm amazed your local authority don't insist on some qualification or training as part of the licensing requirement.
            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by emgruk View Post
              We don't get any training at all and we are only doing this landlord thing by chance
              Sounds like you think someone else is responsible for ensuring you are trained. You are likely to lose a great deal of money if you dont wise up quickly.

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