HMO I live in has Zero Insulation

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  • ATC
    replied
    I am not trying to be unconstructive but your best bet long term probably is to relocate. In the meantime you can look up on this register the energy performance of the house in which you have a room. If there is no EPC or it scored below E you could have a bit of leverage over your landlord as he - or she - would stand to be heavily fined https://www.epcregister.com/

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  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    Originally posted by oscarandjo View Post

    Wow! Thank you! I can see why Landlords are so adored by the nation with such a constructive reply.
    It's worth a try - better than being cold and whinging about the bills.

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  • oscarandjo
    replied
    Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
    Feeling cold? Wear more clothes. You can get thermal undies in Asda. Job done!
    Wow! Thank you! I can see why Landlords are so adored by the nation with such a constructive reply.

    Leave a comment:


  • hcaelblana
    replied
    Originally posted by Berlingogirl View Post
    Feeling cold? Wear more clothes. You can get thermal undies in Asda. Job done!
    Why bother with that when you can just turn the thermostat up & let the landlord pay the bills?

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  • Berlingogirl
    replied
    Feeling cold? Wear more clothes. You can get thermal undies in Asda. Job done!

    Leave a comment:


  • AlexR
    replied
    Originally posted by Mrs Mug View Post

    According to the EPC, I'd need to spend between £14,000 to £29,000, to save the tenant £600 a year.
    I spent the higher amount on my property. As it had an attic room I had to insulate the roof itself to make it liveable and I upgraded everything else at the same time. The OP can solve his problem by laying down rolls of insulation in the roof space.

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  • Mrs Mug
    replied
    Originally posted by AlexR View Post
    but now I have no complaints from the tenants
    I've never had any complaints from my tenants. I've just improved the property when I'd saved enough to do it.

    According to the EPC, I'd need to spend between £14,000 to £29,000, to save the tenant £600 a year.

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  • DPT57
    replied
    Originally posted by AlexR View Post

    the costs could not be justified on an investment basis alone.
    Unless you're planning to move into it at some point, what other basis is there for a BTL property?

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  • AlexR
    replied
    Originally posted by Mrs Mug View Post
    The only thing missing from your list is the under floor insulation.
    I have a 1910 end of terrace which has a C rating. As well as the above the existing internal plaster was removed and replaced with thermal board. The house was empty for over a year and the costs could not be justified on an investment basis alone.

    The house looked almost exactly the same when it was finished, but now I have no complaints from the tenants and it re-lets pretty quickly.

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  • Mrs Mug
    replied
    Originally posted by oscarandjo View Post
    I call BS.
    Really. The assessment was done in September. The only thing missing from your list is the under floor insulation. Even with that fitted, it would still be a D.

    This is the real world. Not just the fantasy world that you seem to think is easily achieved.


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  • oscarandjo
    replied
    Originally posted by Mrs Mug View Post

    My rental property, built in 1930 with no cavity walls, has an EPC of D. The only thing that would get it to a C, is solar panels. I'm not paying for that, I'd get rid of it.
    So you're saying you have under-floor insulation, 270mm loft insulation, LED bulbs, a modern A-rated Combi Boiler, double/triple glazing throughout, TRVs, a modern programmable thermostat, draught excluders, a modern double-glazed PVC front & back door, sealed chimneys and still get a score of D? I call BS.

    Solid Walls were previously seen as "bad" on the EPC rating but the RLA campaigned for it to be changed, so maybe since you had that assessment the score might be better now?
    New software being used to calculate EPCs could see around 80,000 PRS homes re-banded – meaning some landlords may not have to carry out potentially expensive improvement works. New rules concerning Minimum Energy Efficiency Standards come into force in April 2018. From that date, any properties rented out in the private rented sector will need …

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  • Mrs Mug
    replied
    Originally posted by oscarandjo View Post
    It would be good to have a government mandate all rented houses reach a higher standard.

    I think a minimum EPC of C by 2025 would be an ambitious move.
    My rental property, built in 1930 with no cavity walls, has an EPC of D. The only thing that would get it to a C, is solar panels. I'm not paying for that, I'd get rid of it.

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  • AndrewDod
    replied
    Originally posted by oscarandjo View Post
    I think a minimum EPC of C by 2025 would be an ambitious move. Exceptions can apply to properties that can't be modified due to being a listed building, etc.
    I really don't think it is so simple. Such mandating will result in a massive environmental catastrophe as older properties are simply destroyed. There is a massive amount of energy and so on involved in destroying and building properties and setting the bar unrealistically high actually causes more harm than it prevents (and that is apart from the huge destruction of cultural heritage). There are millions and millions of properties that are not worth destroying and only a tiny number of these are "listed".

    Much the same happened with wonderful schemes years back that caused mass destruction of perfectly good cars.



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  • andybenw
    replied
    If the hallway is up to temperature but the bedrooms are cold, then the bedroom radiators are likely undersized. The quick solution is to bring up the temperature to 22. Then the living room and hall will be a little bit hot, whilst the bedrooms will not be quite as cold as they were. Obviously this will cost a bit more.

    I agree it's pointless running heating overnight, I certainly don't do it in the house I live in.

    I would (as others) expect utility costs for a small 7 bed to be more than 150 average over year, so definitely much more in coldest months.

    Just because EPC suggests cavity insulation does not mean a property is suitable. In older properties it can cause damp bridging as the cavities in older properties are much narrower and the beads are designed for modern sized cavities.

    As your moving anyway probably don't get worked up about it. Just bump the heat up a bit.

    Leave a comment:


  • leaseholder64
    replied
    The government does mandate that all rental properties reach a high standard, but that standard is lower than the D that yours already rates. (It is a little complex, in that things don't have to be done if the cost too much.)

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