Tenant did a poo in the sink

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

    Tenant did a poo in the sink

    We have an HMO for young professionals and postgrads, and three months ago, took on a new tenant on a 6 month AST. He was employed, passed the checking process and all seemed fine, til he moved in. After a short while some of the other tenants began to complain to us (not so much him) about his hygiene habits, particularly in the kitchen, and the fact that he never helped with household tasks, and the lack of some interpersonal skills. However, the other day, while two of them were at work, and the other was studying in his room, a human poo appeared in the sink of the utility room, and the others, who we all trust, are convinced it was this particular tenant. There were three toilets available to this tenant, including in his ensuite, so the reasoning behind this is a mystery. The doors were locked, so it wasn't a random intruder, or animal. Understandably, the others now don't want to be in the house while he is around, and expect us to do something about it (needless to say we went over and cleaned it and bleached the sink) but I mean a more permanent solution. Normally I would issue a Section 21, but obviously there are another 3 months to run on the AST. The problem is also that while by a process of elimination I am sure it could only be this one tenant, from his point of view, to be blamed would seem random and without proof. We don't want to lose the other three who are great tenants, but I can understand them living in fear of what he might do next. What can we do for them? My only thought is to approach the new tenant and tell him that the others believe it was him, and that maybe it's not in his interests to live with people who think that of him, but is there anything else I can do?

    #2
    You have to do something. The first thing is to retain some evidence such as a photograph and possibly a sample for DNA analysis if needed. You need to have a written log of what happened who said what and where they were at the time. This needs to be your recollection of who said what etc. If the perpetrator knows you have evidence, and will use it,then it would be easier to negotiate.
    At some stage ( quite soon) you need to take a view on this tenant. You may have to find your own words but something like ' its not working as expected- if you move out by the end of the month I will.give you deposit back' or some other deal that encourages him to leave. If this cannot be done on an informal basis I would immediately re-check the 'suspect' tenant's references by telephoning referees ,parents or ex employers who may be able to give verbal information. If he was like this before it is possible someone has given him a reference to move him on but you may be able to hint at problems and try and gather more information.
    My guess is that he is known to have problems and someone (parents, girlfriend, friends)have tried to set him up in a HMO and if they get wind of trouble brewing they may come to help him move on. I had a similar problem with a guy who was an alcoholic who became a problem to the other tenants. I had to throw him out - he was in arrears by then and was forced to find somewhere else but it was almost expected by those who knew him.
    If you get the good tenants leave then you should empty the house and start again.

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks Alex. Yes that all sounds pretty much like what we will need to do, and I appreciate your taking time to respond. It's a horrible thing to have to deal with, but as you say, we have to do something to protect the other tenants, because if he is capable of doing something like this, then what else could he do? The DPS have his deposit so that is straightforward to give back. He came straight from home after finishing a degree at the local university, so there wasn't a residential history, and he was starting a first postgrad job, so no employer one either. So I think the parents may be the place to start. In previous times, I have found it best to ease difficult tenants out gently, but I have always had them for longer than the 6 months before trouble has begun, so always had a Section 21 to fall back on. Shame there isn't something in Section 8 to protect the others, as I think they would like him gone 'yesterday' if possible.

      Comment


        #4
        There is something in section 8, but it sounds like there isn't anything in the tenancy agreement.

        Did the other residents not get a chance to vet the newcomer?

        Comment


          #5
          I have consulted our solicitor, who wrote the lease, and there is a possibility to get him to leave under Section 8 because of the terms, which is great news. The other residents don't vet the newcomers - they see it as an nuisance to be asked to gather and meet potential new housemates - they're not interested and they know that I check people out. Sometimes the newcomers ask if I can arrange for them to meet the existing tenants, and I'll email and I rarely get a response from the others because they just aren't interested in being vetted by someone who may not move in. Busy lives and all that.

          Ironically, there was one occasion where I took a potential new tenant round, and three of the others were in the lounge watching telly, and they got chatting with him, and after he'd gone they all said 'yeah - he was great'. Biggest psychopath we ever had.



          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by bananas View Post
            The other residents don't vet the newcomers - they see it as an nuisance to be asked to gather and meet potential new housemates - they're not interested and they know that I check people out. Sometimes the newcomers ask if I can arrange for them to meet the existing tenants, and I'll email and I rarely get a response from the others because they just aren't interested in being vetted by someone who may not move in.
            They should be interested and you must stick to this system. They can't expect a landlord to do it all and screen their co renters and get it 100% right every time. As your tenants did not do this, then they have to accept it is partly their fault you took a 'wrong' one and also accept that getting rid of someone is not always quick, easy and painless. As a landlord I can remember times when I refused to take people because I viewed that they did not fit and had empty rooms for long periods of time , which is expensive, and I appreciate not every landlord will do this.

            Comment


              #7
              I gave notice to a problem tenant earlier this year because the others were consistently reporting that he was messy, inconsiderate, etc. It has been expensive due to the void that followed but I think it was the right thing to do out of fairness to the remaining (good) tenants. In this case it was done at the end of the fixed term, so contractually it wasn't a problem.
              There is a fine line between irony and stupidity. If I say something absurd please assume that I am being facetious.

              Comment

              Latest Activity

              Collapse

              Working...
              X