Landlord asking tenants to be around to let builder in

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    Landlord asking tenants to be around to let builder in

    Hi,

    Is it ok for the landlord of a House of Multiple Occupancy to ask tenants if they are around to let builders/tradesmen into their home? or should this be the full responsibility of the landlord?

    I ask because I am a tenant in an HMO who works from home - the landlord is always asking me if I am going to be around to let builders in. I am curious to know if this is ok behaviour by the landlord?. Shouldn't it be the responsibility of the landlord to sort this out theirself and not hassle tenants?

    I understand as I work from home that listening out for a doorbell and opening a door is not hard.....BUT....

    1. I am working, I like to be left in peace. I do not like having to listen out for a knock on the door as I like to work with headphones on.
    2. If I say 'yes Mr landlord, I can let a builder in tomorrow', but then the next day I have a need to go out....but I can't.....this is an annoyance.
    3. What if the builders late and I need to go out.
    3. What happens if I forget someone is coming round and I go out..... the builder is annoyed as nobody is there to let him in, and maybe charges the landlord a callout fee.....landlord gets annoyed with me.

    Thanks.









    #2
    Originally posted by trooper8 View Post
    the landlord is always asking me
    He's free to ask, - you're free to say no.

    Comment


      #3
      Or agree if it's a short time window.
      I'm out most of the day, but I can let them in between 8 and 9.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

      Comment


        #4
        Do you just rent your room, or jointly the whole thing? (ie. was there a single tenancy agreement you all signed?)

        Presuming the latter, of course the landlord is free to give notice as specified in your tenancy agreement, and then,

        a) if you do not reply then he cannot enter and the work will not be done
        b) or you can let the tradesman in
        c) or the landlord can give the key to the trademan if you give permission to access

        Take your pick.
        Do you want the work done?

        No the landlord does not have "to be around to let builders in". Why do you think (in your absence) the landlord is any more trustworthy than the builder. What you can't reasonably do is say "I want the work done, I don't want to be around when it is done, but I am happy for it to be done in my absence, but I want to specify exactly which human has to supervise the other human doing the work"

        What you also can't do is to agree to wait in and then be a "no show" when the builder arrives.

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
          Do you just rent your room, or jointly the whole thing? (ie. was there a single tenancy agreement you all signed?)

          Presuming the latter, of course the landlord is free to give notice as specified in your tenancy agreement, and then,

          a) if you do not reply then he cannot enter and the work will not be done
          b) or you can let the tradesman in
          c) or the landlord can give the key to the trademan if you give permission to access

          Take your pick.
          Do you want the work done?

          No the landlord does not have "to be around to let builders in". Why do you think (in your absence) the landlord is any more trustworthy than the builder. What you can't reasonably do is say "I want the work done, I don't want to be around when it is done, but I am happy for it to be done in my absence, but I want to specify exactly which human has to supervise the other human doing the work"

          What you also can't do is to agree to wait in and then be a "no show" when the builder arrives.


          I just rent my room separately from all other tenants.....

          If the landlord lets us know they or someone is coming round to the house, then that's cool. We don't usually confirm it's ok, as long as they send the message warning us then it's cool....Access is never denied to the landlord or tradesmen.

          Anyway.....

          The work isn't that important, not to me anyway.....if it was, I'd be more keen to help out and make sure I am around to let the tradesman in.

          I would have thought it's written into some rules/laws/regulations that this is 100% the landlords duty to deal with this sort of thing themselves. They are hoping a tenant is available so they don't have to book a day off work as holiday, or finish work early. Essentially they are not available to manage the house / don't have anyone available to help them manage the house like an agent. Instead they want to put responsibility on a tenant to make sure the tradesman gains access to do the work.

          Basically - all I want to be able to say to the landlord is 'This is ultimately your responsibility and it's best that now and in future you either make arrangements to give any tradesmen a key, or you come to the house, or get someone else to come to the house to let a tradesman in. Tenants do not want to have to be tied to staying in the house when their plans may change and they may need to go out. Also, if a tenant agrees to be around to let a tradesman in, if the tenant forgets someone is coming over and goes out, what happens then?.....as you will likely be charged a call out fee and this could cause issues between yourself and the tenant, so it would make sense that you take full responsibility for letting anyone into the house.'

          Comment


            #6
            I have this problem, but I'm the landlord. I have to get a gas certificate every year, but the boiler cupboard requires taking apart before they will touch it, and re-assembling afterwards. This means I have to stooge about for hours in my tenants' kitchen waiting for British Gas to show up.

            I can see that this annoys my tenants who work from home, but I can see no alternative.

            Be careful what you wish for!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by trooper8 View Post
              .....
              I would have thought it's written into some rules/laws/regulations that this is 100% the landlords duty to deal with this sort of thing themselves. .....
              Yes of course: But there's nothing preventing landlord asking nor wrong for landlord asking tenant(s) if they can help. Nor, ditto, for tenants saying no.

              But a landlord may evict a tenant for no reason at all (Thatcher's 1988 Housing Act).

              I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by trooper8 View Post
                I would have thought it's written into some rules/laws/regulations that this is 100% the landlords duty to deal with this sort of thing themselves.
                No there is no such law, rule or regulation.

                (If what you mean is that landlord or their agent has to attend personally).

                If it is urgent or legally mandated work (gas certificates) the landlord asks for permission to enter and then provides workman with key. For any other work if tenant does not wish to act as any normal householder would, work does not get done if tenant does not permit or facilitate access. The landlord attends if they wish to do so or need to do so to supervise the work.

                This is not a hotel.... (which would have far higher rent/cost)

                Comment


                  #9
                  This is a multiple tenancy HMO with communal areas. The landlord does not need cooperation from tenants to access the communal areas, so should have no expectation that they will supervise workmen. (Note though that some tenants of such arrangements post here as though they thought they should be able to exclude workmen from communal areas.)

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Originally posted by leaseholder64 View Post
                    This is a multiple tenancy HMO with communal areas. The landlord does not need cooperation from tenants to access the communal areas, so should have no expectation that they will supervise workmen. (Note though that some tenants of such arrangements post here as though they thought they should be able to exclude workmen from communal areas.)
                    Agree completely, though OP does not say works are in the common area - the "no expectation that they will supervise workmen" applies equally to a joint tenancy or a single tenant.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
                      For any other work if tenant does not wish to act as any normal householder would, work does not get done if tenant does not permit or facilitate access.
                      While that's the practical state of affairs, I'd be interested to see it tested as a legal issue.

                      The landlord's repair obligations aren't contingent on the tenant's co-operation, they're pretty absolute.
                      If a tenant declines to stay at home to allow a central heating engineer to repair a defective boiler, the landlord's obligation to repair it doesn't go away.

                      Obviously, in such a case, the mutuallity of incentive means the tenant stays at home, but I can imagine a situation where that's not possible (the tenant is away, for example), and I think the landlord has to be involved.

                      Not that there's anything wrong with asking a tenant to let someone in, either, particularly if they're usually home.
                      But that shouldn't constrain the tenant either, if they say they're in and out or usually working on headphones, the landlord can only ask them to modify their behaviour for a time.
                      And, if they won't, they won't.

                      For most people it only crops up occassionally, anyway.
                      Gas safety testing is the biggest culprit - it's mandatory on and, in most cases, impacts only the landlord.
                      And it's got to be done in the working day and I've never found anyone who would give a sensible window for a time that would allow someone to "pop home" rather than take half a day off work.
                      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

                      Comment

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