Advice needed on protecting dad’s house from future sister in law

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    #16
    Yes but you can't just give money away to confound a potential lawsuit which would involve you handing over money.

    Your dad is very unlikely to be removed from his home in any even vaguely short timescale under the circumstances you describe when his then ex daughter in law owns half of it. So if that is your SOLE concern I would leave things well alone.

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      #17
      If there was a solicitor involved when the gift was made, I'd be really surprised that the issue of what happens if your son meets someone etc didn't crop up.
      It's almost a reflex for solicitors - the number of times I've been through the same questions when transferring things to my son is remarkable.
      Perhaps he just looks like someone who's likely to die young, become a drug addict or fall for someone unsuitable.
      When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
      Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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        #18
        Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
        Yes but you can't just give money away to confound a potential lawsuit which would involve you handing over money.

        Your dad is very unlikely to be removed from his home in any even vaguely short timescale under the circumstances you describe when his then ex daughter in law owns half of it. So if that is your SOLE concern I would leave things well alone.
        Yes you may be right.

        What are your thoughts on this potentially not being a case of a GROB?

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          #19
          Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
          If there was a solicitor involved when the gift was made, I'd be really surprised that the issue of what happens if your son meets someone etc didn't crop up.
          It's almost a reflex for solicitors - the number of times I've been through the same questions when transferring things to my son is remarkable.
          Perhaps he just looks like someone who's likely to die young, become a drug addict or fall for someone unsuitable.
          I guess it does depend on the solicitor. All we did was fill out a form starting where the money was coming from and that was pretty much it.

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            #20
            Originally posted by Madmax86 View Post

            Yes you may be right.

            What are your thoughts on this potentially not being a case of a GROB?
            It is quite clearly a GROB. It might not have been if full market rate of rent was also paid to your brother.

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