Will letting need energy performance certificate?

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    Will letting need energy performance certificate?

    RLA have an energy performance certificates questionaire. Apparently after oct 08 you will have to provide a certificate to tenants moving into a rented house.

    Ridiculous - we pay the bills on most of our houses, I know how efficient the house is. It may be a small factor in the tenants decision making process but only small - if the house is good, the tenant will want it. Would a tenant rent a sh1thole if it has an A rating and turn down the luxury apartment that has an F rating?

    http://www.rla.org.uk/landlord/quest.../epc/epc.shtml

    A friend of mine is selling a victorian terrace and has made a formal complaint after her EPC recommended installing cavity wall installation.... into a house with two-leaf brick walls - eg, no cavity. These muppets are.... well, muppets and - at the moment at least - the certificates would be better used as loft insulation, for all the relevence they have towards energy performance.
    Liability statement. My liability to you is not to exceed the amount you are paying for my recommendations or advice.

    I see a bright new future, where chickens can cross the road with no fear of having their motives questioned

    #2
    Originally posted by Wickerman View Post
    RLA have an energy performance certificates questionaire. Apparently after oct 08 you will have to provide a certificate to tenants moving into a rented house.

    Ridiculous - we pay the bills on most of our houses, I know how efficient the house is. It may be a small factor in the tenants decision making process but only small - if the house is good, the tenant will want it. Would a tenant rent a sh1thole if it has an A rating and turn down the luxury apartment that has an F rating?

    http://www.rla.org.uk/landlord/quest.../epc/epc.shtml

    A friend of mine is selling a victorian terrace and has made a formal complaint after her EPC recommended installing cavity wall installation.... into a house with two-leaf brick walls - eg, no cavity. These muppets are.... well, muppets and - at the moment at least - the certificates would be better used as loft insulation, for all the relevence they have towards energy performance.
    As Kermit might say - the government have made a right piggy out of this!

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Colincbayley View Post
      As Kermit might say - the government have made a right piggy out of this!
      Gentlemen
      I do sympathise regarding on-going government interference in your business, but it should be noted that the provision of Energy Performance Certificates (EPC) is an EU directive and as such our Gov. must implement them.
      Regarding your friends experience to an untrained eye a wall which only shows "stretcher bond" with no header course could be mistaken for a cavity wall if insufficient care is taken. An alternative reason for cavity wall insulation to be wrongly recommended could be a software glitch or data wrongly inputted. I accept that the Domestic Energy Assessor (DEA) should however spot these mistakes prior to the being finalised and correct them.
      It should be noted that the profession of DEA is new to this country and that some of the Training Providers (TP) are not really very proficient IMO. It should be further noted that there were constant changes to course content which were beyond the TPs control but meant that people who trained earlier could miss out on course updates.
      From the very start of this whole sorry mess the gov. have constantly moved the finishing post, the starting post and in fact the whole damn course, they actively encouraged people with & without any relevant experience to train as DEAs with wild promises regarding the amount of work available and the amount of money which could be earned now leading to many DEAs losing a lot of money and in some cases their homes and with their marriages on the rocks through no fault of their own. I realise this has little to do with your situation but it does give you some back ground to just how badly this gov. screwed things up.
      As Oct. 2008 approaches and EPCs for rental properties become a legal requirement (on change of tenancy) may I suggest that all landlords take care in whom they employ to carry out the energy surveys. All DEAs must have DipDEA as a minimum requirement,carry PI and PL insurance and be registered with a suitable accreditation body, however it could be worth your while checking whether they have any previous experience in the building industry or associated trades and whether they belong to a professional body such as the Institute of Domestic Energy Assessors (IDEA).http://www.whatstheidea.net/
      To sum up Yes HM Gov have made a right pigs ear of Domestic Energy Assessment for both private and rental properties but EPCs, like them or not are here to stay.

      Thanks for reading my rant

      Steve Iley DipDEA MIDEA

      Ps
      If you think they've made a mess of this just wait 'till the Non-Domestic scheme is implemented IMHO

      Energy Surveys North East - Serving Teesside & Durham[/COLOR]

      Be like a duck
      calm on the outside
      but paddling like ....crazy

      Comment


        #4
        Domestic Energy Reports

        I must have been sleeping, missed this coming.

        It looks as thought the content of the reports has so little relevance to the people receiving them that there will only be one criteria to consider for any landlord, and that of course is price!

        Comment


          #5
          I think this is yet another piece of unnecessary legislation that, as with deposit protection, will put more burden on the letting industry and will ultimately be paid for by tenants through higher rents.

          If the Government were truly interested in cutting energy wasted in homes they would do something practical like waiving Vat on insulation, double glazing, etc etc

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Wickerman
            The people doing the certificates should be those with experience of property - members of RICS, crosstrained (if necessary) in energy efficiency would be a good start!
            Hi Wickerman,
            There is no reason and never has been any reason why RICS members could not be energy assessors if they where suitably qualified. Maybe we should ask why so few of the RICS membership have the DipDEA qualification. Could it be that they consider the fees chargeable for Domestic Energy Assessments are to low?
            CMB Happy
            The content of the reports when done properly is a good assessment of a properties current energy efficiency, and how it can be improved. How you use the certificates and the value you get from them is up to you. Regarding the price of a survey, shop around you will be surprised at how low the cost is, but remember as with everything in this life the quality of service can be quite variable i.e. you get what you pay for!
            Fallenlord
            I hate to defend this government but you should look in to the many and various GOVERNMENT GRANT SCHEMES are available such as Warmfront. Many of these are claimed for by your tenant but the work improves your property at no or little cost to yourself.
            Hope this answers your questions gentlemen.

            Be Lucky

            Steve Iley DipDEA MIDEA

            Energy Surveys North East - Serving Teesside & Durham[/COLOR]

            Be like a duck
            calm on the outside
            but paddling like ....crazy

            Comment


              #7
              Yes we have used a couple of schemes although they have only been available for tenants on benefit.

              I feel that Mandatory EPCs will make almost minimal difference to the "let-ability" of a property, unless tenant demand suddenly dries up and with a general shortage of property nationally I cant see this happening. Certainly in our area tenants priorities are to find somewhere to live, rather than worry whether the emersion tank is lagged.

              The money used to advertise, train, administer, regulate etc could have been better spent reducing the costs of insulating homes thus making a direct contribution towards reducing energy wastage to everyone, rather than just giving out yet more advise and creating more bureaucracy.

              I do think that this is another example of the government trying to sound good on climate change but in fact making no positive contribution.
              Last edited by fallenlord; 09-02-2008, 20:15 PM. Reason: delated for clarity

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by fallenlord View Post
                Yes we have used a couple of schemes although they have only been available for tenants on benefit.

                I feel that Mandatory EPCs will make almost minimal difference to the "let-ability" of a property, unless tenant demand suddenly dries up and with a general shortage of property nationally I cant see this happening. Certainly in our area tenants priorities are to find somewhere to live, rather than worry whether the emersion tank is lagged.

                The money used to advertise, train, administer, regulate etc could have been better spent reducing the costs of insulating homes thus making a direct contribution towards reducing energy wastage to everyone, rather than just giving out yet more advise and creating more bureaucracy.

                I do think that this is another example of the government trying to sound good on climate change but in fact making no positive contribution.
                I don't think EPCs are about making properties more "let-able" as such, however if a prospective tenant where choosing between 2 identical properties but one of them had much lower running costs due to better energy efficiency measures which one do you think they would they pick?
                Regarding your comment regarding money spent on training I must point out that all training costs regarding DEAs are met by the DEA. Believe me the DEA and HI have more reason than most to despair at this governments dire handling of EPCs & HIPs.

                Energy Surveys North East - Serving Teesside & Durham[/COLOR]

                Be like a duck
                calm on the outside
                but paddling like ....crazy

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by ste.ve View Post
                  I don't think EPCs are about making properties more "let-able" as such, however if a prospective tenant where choosing between 2 identical properties but one of them had much lower running costs due to better energy efficiency measures which one do you think they would they pick?
                  In my area, it is not a case that a tenant has a choice between 2 properties, there is such a shortage of rental properties that it is the LL choosing between 10 tenants!!

                  As a professional LL, I can not see any benefit in EPCs, all they will do is add yet another layer of red tape and increase rents to pay for them.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Does anyone know what the law number/ref number of the requirement for rental properties to have a EPC is?????

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Colincbayley View Post
                      In my area, it is not a case that a tenant has a choice between 2 properties, there is such a shortage of rental properties that it is the LL choosing between 10 tenants!!

                      As a professional LL, I can not see any benefit in EPCs, all they will do is add yet another layer of red tape and increase rents to pay for them.
                      I think your missing the point. The main reason for EPCs is to show on the current efficiency of the property and advise on how this can be improved. The idea is to help reduce our carbon footprints and save the planet. You may agree or disagree on whether they are likely to achieve this but it is at least a noble aim. I would think at an average cost of say £90 exc. vat spread out over the ten years that the EPC is valid for the impact on rental increases would be minimal.

                      Steve Iley DipDEA MIDEA

                      Energy Surveys North East - Serving Teesside & Durham[/COLOR]

                      Be like a duck
                      calm on the outside
                      but paddling like ....crazy

                      Comment

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