Skirting around the issue...

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    Skirting around the issue...

    I have spent all day scribing frikking skirting board with a mitre saw, coping saw and Dremel-clone multi-tool... this is nuts. There must be a reasonably priced tool out there that makes this job easier?

    I did initial research and it seems you can pay hundreds of £s for some kind of jig... costs more than the mitre saw! But I'm wanting something I can get from The Range - it's probably a product made by JML... JML Easyskirt or something like that... £19.99 and I'd be up there like a ferret up a drainpipe.

    This renovation? Here's a good idea - "let's take the skirting off and replace it all!" - not a good idea, a mad idea. Regrets? I've had a few...

    #2
    http://www.screwfix.com/p/forge-steel-mitre-box/7217C

    £4:99
    I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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      #3
      Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
      Is that thing really made of steel though? It looks suspiciously like black plastic.

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        #4
        Originally posted by theartfullodger View Post
        Nice try. And thanks. But I can do the mitres. The scribing is the PITA!

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          #5
          You don't need to scribe the corners Hippo. You just cut a 45 degree angle on one piece, then use the profile as a guide for your coping saw. See here:

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            #6
            Yeah... ain't that scribing? That's what I'm doing. The profile isn't a simple chamfer sadly.

            Put one piece on the wall, no special cut. Get the other piece, 45 degree mitre, observe the stuff that needs cutting out, cut it out, tidy up. PITA.

            One person advised me to butt them up. Another advised an internal mitre. I don't let them work on this kind of thing any more.

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              #7
              Are you using gripfix or the likes to fix. If so, hit some uneven walls and you' ll come across the next PITA.

              And non 90 degree corners where a 45 degree mitre is a useful as pee all.

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                #8
                Gripfill and a nail gun. Not had major issues with that part yet, some walls are... curvy, yes.

                I've got an electronic angle finder and a mitre saw, so the non-90 degree angles aren't proving too much of a challenge. I'm quite pleased with most results, just every scribe takes, like, 10 to 15 minutes to get just acceptable... I will still need filler afterwards due to gaps.

                I only have 9 more pieces to fit... 9 more scribes (I left them until last).

                1 piece is scribed at both ends due to me making a mistake in laying pieces down earlier... not exactly sure how I'm going to do that properly. I think each piece should have a maximum of 1 scribe.

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                  #9
                  How do you find the nail gun. Does it drive the nails into brick?

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                    #10
                    If the walls are 90 degrees to each other and you measure lengths accurately, then an electric mitre saw is all you should need to achieve a perfect cut and fit.

                    If they are not, then, yes, it will take longer. 15 minutes per joint and/or some woodfiller does not sound that unrealistic. Think how many years of pleasure you will get from the 10 beautifully scribed corners for your half day's work on them, compared with having to look at 10 botched corners for years on end.

                    The skirting boards which upset me most are the ones which have been botched but the customer wants them to stay as stained softwood (which looks hideous anyway in my eyes). If I filled and paint them them, they would look so much better. Real oak ones are generally fine - they have usually been done professionally - but pine ones fitted badly then stained drag down the spirit, don't you think?

                    Good luck with them, anyway.
                    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by andybenw View Post
                      How do you find the nail gun. Does it drive the nails into brick?
                      It's alright, actually... more of a tack gun. Longest 'nail' it will take is 45mm. But they're going in quite flush, mostly, and only require a little bit of extra punching-in. Sometimes one sticks out a few millimetres and that's annoying. It's only an electric one.

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                        #12
                        Originally posted by Hippogriff View Post
                        It's alright, actually... more of a tack gun. Longest 'nail' it will take is 45mm. But they're going in quite flush, mostly, and only require a little bit of extra punching-in. Sometimes one sticks out a few millimetres and that's annoying. It's only an electric one.
                        I suppose as long as they hold long enough for the gripfill to take effect they don't need to be the strongest. I might try it next time as I find drilling and rawlplugging skirting a real chore.

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                          #13
                          You know the little trick about tapping the rawlplug through the hole you just drilled in the skirting, don't you Andy?

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by JK0 View Post
                            You know the little trick about tapping the rawlplug through the hole you just drilled in the skirting, don't you Andy?
                            I always assumed that the larger hole for the rawlplug would just mean the screwhead bursting through the wood if any pressure was applied to close the skirt to the wall. Obviously I was wrong.

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                              #15
                              I use a 3/16" HSS bit to go through the wood, and counter sink the hole. I put a 6mm SDS plus bit through the hole to drill out the masonry. I put a red rawlplug in the timber hole and knock it in flush with the wood. Then I put a wood screw in the hole and use it as a drift to knock the rawlplug fully into the masonry. Tighten up the woodscrew and you will see the timber being pulled into the wall.

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