Bathroom planning

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    #16
    Ha, almost snap, I am also taking on (my first ) LHA tenant, but also want the property to revalue well when I come to take out a mortgage and subsequent remortgage ! shame its too far away for you to determine where the drains are, which way they run etc. they may even run very close to the point you want your new wc fitting !!! nowadays its pretty easy to make connections to the sewer (so long as its yours of course and not shared) the work is in the digging out !!! if it was all dug out etc it would only take a day to install new connection, new soil stack etc - that's assuming you have that option of course, the 'end of terrace' might be a street LOL

    on a similar note - I installed a downstairs wc and to get the soil pipe to the outside, I built the internal wall out in the kitchen (was having a new kitchen) and that worked perfectly, yes a lot more work, but in reality it was only a day to build stud wall etc and fit pipework. do you have that option in the bathroom, you could then fit wall hung wc and concealed cistern, they look fantastic. you only need 110mm so it doesn't take all the room, and might make it easier for concealed pipework to a shower over a bath, provides nice surface to tile on etc,

    it seems to contradict most peoples way of thinking, but I prefer to design the bathroom, siting of wc etc and then work out how to connect the soil pipe, though its always MUCH easier and cheaper to leave the wc where it is !!!!

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      #17
      Bit late to the party as have been away...

      Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
      take your comment about not going round a corner. Would it be different if the pipe was 'roddable'?
      Round corners doesn't seem impossible, but can someone put it into English for me?
      Yes, 'roddability' is a crucial feature and certainly something that Building Control will be interested in. I think 'round corners' will be those with a large radius, which are designed for rods (and turds!) to be able to go round, as opposed to a sharp, 90-deg bend.

      My own experience here might give some food for thought. About 10 years ago I divided up a terraced house into two for renting out (actually, reinstating what was the original two houses, and the deal-breaker on feasibility of doing this was always going to be the toilet for what was going to be the corner house - the sewers being behind the property in a communal yard. After much to-ing and fro-ing with Building Control here's what we ended up with.

      New toilet had to be at the front of the house; the soil pipe drops down into the (wait for it!) kitchen, where it runs the length of the room at ceiling height, with adequate fall. It then turns through 90 degrees into the next-door house and drops to floor level within a walk-in cupboard; then runs along a trench cut into the solid floor of next-door's kitchen, and out into the back yard where it connects to the drains. The whole thing is boxed in with double-thickness plasterboard and masses of sound insulation along the entire length (plus fire precautions where it passes through to next door), and was passed by Building Control. I know it sounds totally bizarre and more then a bit dodgy! but it works fine; is almost completely silent, and has never blocked in 10 years. All the pipework is accessible via rods from either end; the only bit preventing a rod from passing all the way through is the bend where it passes through to next door... at that point there is actually an emergency access hatch in the boxing and a 'rodding eye' in the pipe, though God help us if ever that should be needed!

      Just thought this might help as food for thought - thinking outside the box etc

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        #18
        Fitting the soil pipe around a 90 degree bend is fine,as for the falls the general rule of thumb is 1:40 going as high as 1:80 if other services are connected.If building control did have an issue there only interested in rod ability,so you could fit a rodding point either before or after the 90 degree bend

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          #19
          Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
          Just thought this might help as food for thought - thinking outside the box etc
          as opposed to stinking inside the box(ing in) , there is always a solution !!!

          not sure why BC wont allow you to run it externally with 92' bends, but then again I would need to see it properly to come up with a solution, I still suggest getting a decent plumber in!!

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