Replacement boiler for 2-bed terrace

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    Replacement boiler for 2-bed terrace

    I have a 100-yr-old standard 2-up and 2-down terrace which is let out to tenants.
    The boiler is old (30 yrs?) and has just failed.
    I'm investigating whether it's repairable but suspect I will need to replace.

    Any recommendations for a good make/model for such a property, please?
    Cost is important, but don't want to buy cheap carp.
    I'm looking for reliability, and preferably a long guarantee.
    (State-of-the-art performance and energy efficiency are not needed.)

    Current boiler is feeding 4 rads, and hot water to kitchen sink and bath.
    Oddly, an electric shower has been added over the bath even tho its just next door to the boiler. (In downstairs bathroom next to kitchen cpd containing boiler.)
    I don't know whether this suggests anything – insufficient flow rate? – and whether to leave well alone, or get this changed to run off the boiler.

    Grateful for any comments or advice, thanks.

    #2
    Evening,

    I fit Worcester Bosch combi's in my rentals and would always recommend them.

    The 24i junior should be enough for your house - I also use mixer valves for showers to avoid the added complication of electric showers.

    Hope this helps

    Comment


      #3
      Thanks for that; they do seem to be highly thought of

      Comment


        #4
        I prefer Vaillants recently put one in my own place and happy with it.

        http://www.vaillant.co.uk/homeowners...s-combination/

        They also do a five year guarantee.

        I don't see you having a problem having an electric shower as it's a good back up for when the boiler packs up so they can still have a hot shower.

        Depending on your mains pressure and what spec the elcetric shower a normal shower would probably provide a better showering experience

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          #5
          Thanks r0b.
          I actually have a 28-yr old Vaillant in my own house that hasn't broken down yet!

          Comment


            #6
            Have a look at http://everlastingboilers.co.uk/

            £38 a month including annual service and unlimited repairs (parts and labour) for the life of the boiler. Can be fitted in 48 hours.

            Over the life, it is relatively expensive and there is, of course, small print, but maybe worth a look.

            Comment


              #7
              Oh, that's interesting, thanks very much; I had no idea such a thing existed.
              £4500 over 10 years is certainly more than the boiler installation would cost, but not outrageously so, considering the advantages.
              Unfortunately the small print isn't on their website; you have to ask for a callback and I fear a hard sell...
              Will think about that.

              Another option, if I can get the boiler patched up until the end of this tenancy, is to take a tenant next time who is entitled to a free boiler!
              I actually considered this when I let the house only2 minths back, but in the end I went for the lower-risk tenants with a professional job, rather than the nice girl on housing benefit whose potentail guarantor turned out to have a CCJ!

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by slopemaster View Post
                Unfortunately the small print isn't on their website; you have to ask for a callback and I fear a hard sell.
                For me, the issue was that you are effectively tied in forever, the boiler is never yours. Now they may end up replacing it with a new one every 5 years (if that's cheaper than maintaining the existing one) but after X years (I think it was 10) you have a choice - sign up for a new deal at whatever they are charging then OR organise a new boiler because the boys will be round to take theirs away!

                An attractive issue is the fixed cost - £38 a month is a bit steep for 'boiler cover' right now, but it will be a bargain when you are still paying the same in 6-7-8-9-10 years time.

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                  #9
                  Yes, quite.
                  I also wonder what happens if you sell the house earlier.
                  I suppose it would be similar - if the new owner doen't want to continue the payments, the boys will be round to take theirs away!

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I spoke to them and it wasn't hard sell at all, but they were a bit reluctant to send me a copy of the small print in their T&C.
                    I think they like to bring these round to show you when they do the survey - so maybe that's when they do the hard sell!

                    Anyway, I found out you can buy yourself out at any point (28 dyas notice) if you pay for the boiler + installation - £2700 at the outset, then gradually decreasing as it gets older. So, doesn't sound at all bad.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by slopemaster View Post
                      (State-of-the-art performance and energy efficiency are not needed.)

                      .
                      You won't be saying that when your property gets an E or F EPC rating and you are not allowed to rent it out unless you improve that rating...it's coming:

                      http://www.scottfraser.co.uk/news/vi...s-to-be-banned

                      Or is your property amazingly well-insulated, triple glazed, and with solar panels?
                      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                        #12
                        You misunderstand me.
                        All modern boilers, so far as I know, are A rated and will therefore be a big improvement on the existing one.
                        (According to my EPC it would improve the rating for the house from D to C, which is pretty good for an old house with solid walls.)

                        However, I don't need the very best energy efficiency.

                        Incidentally, I got the boiler repaired; it needed a new pump.
                        But the research I did will be useful when it does come to be replaced.

                        Comment


                          #13
                          Originally posted by slopemaster View Post
                          Y
                          (According to my EPC it would improve the rating for the house from D to C, which is pretty good for an old house with solid walls.)

                          .
                          It is indeed.
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                          Comment

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