Cavity Walls

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  • Cavity Walls

    Hi

    How can I tell if my properties have cavity walls?

    Many thanks
    Claymore

  • #2
    I think if you can see half bricks, then you have solid walls, as they are actually the end of a brick tying the two courses of brick together. If you just have a consistent brick pattern, (and the wall is thick enough for a cavity), you probably do.

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    • #3
      Not necessarily JK0, I had an 1867 cottage in Hampshire, and the exterior face was Flemish bond - i.e. with bricks laid alternately lengthways (stretchers) and end on (headers) certainly giving the impression that it was single skin 9" thick wall. But when I was stripping the paint from the internal side of the same wall, I noticed that the bricks were laid English or running bond.

      Changing the windows confirmed that it was actually a cavity wall - one of the earliest apparently, and meaning that each header was in fact only a half brick - in this case blackened from being on the salted outside of the fired stack of bricks in the kiln. The overall effect was a pretty black/red chequerboard effect. A farm cottage on a country estate where blissfully the LOTM had an excellent eye for architectural detail - and cheap labour...

      JK0's right in saying that if it's running bond only on the outside then it'll almost certainly be a cavity. Have a look to see how thick the wall appears up the side of a window, if it's around 9", it's likely single, if it's closer to 12", likely cavity.
      Last edited by Dottie; 27-12-2012, 18:52 PM. Reason: correct American spelling :-(

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      • #4
        Sorry, I'm confused.

        They are all brick and the bricks run length ways with traditional brick pattern if that makes any sense.

        The properties are - a victorian semi - built 1900, a 1980 starter house, a purpose built maisonette approx 1950, ex-council house approx 1965, and a bungalow built approx 1945.

        Any clarification would be good.

        Many thanks
        Claymore

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        • #5
          Cut a brick out and have a look/drill a hole look with an endoscope/drain camera.

          What the above have been saying that if you can establish what's on eh outside and whats in the inside, and the relative thickness you can establish to a reasonable degree of certainty, the construction.

          My answer is the only way to be certain
          Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

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          • #6
            Thanks for replies.

            I might invite some companies round to quote for the work and then they can do the testing for me.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Claymore View Post
              Thanks for replies.

              I might invite some companies round to quote for the work and then they can do the testing for me.
              That's the way. They'll put a periscope in to see.

              Alternatively drill a hole yourself with a long 6mm or so masonry bit in the mortar, see how deep you go before you hit the void. If it's more than 5" of solid masonry then you have no cavity.

              In early cavity walls it is quite likely to be *part* cavity, or narrow cavity, when it can't be insulated.

              ML
              Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

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              • #8
                They drill a whole in the mortar to insert the periscope, then seal it back afterwards. I had it done at home (also re. cavity wall insulation) and it takes 5 minutes.
                As it was in relation to the recent offers of free cavity insulation that did not even cost me anything.

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                • #9
                  Is the brickwork visible externally or is it rendered in some way? If it is visible then you can see the 'bond' the bricks are laid in. If it is 'stretcher' bond (google it) then 99.999999999% it is a cavity wall.
                  There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                  If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                  Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

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