condensation solution or con ??

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    condensation solution or con ??

    Hi

    I have been told that fitting a drimaster anti condensation machine cures condensation mould has anyone had any experience of this ?

    Thanks

    #2
    Condensation occurs in certain conditions. Fitting a de-humidifier may reduce the humidity in the air but if the property isn't being adequately heated to begin with (ventilation is the other element but a de-humidifier makes this (very simply) irrelevant) then condensaton is likely to still form.

    I'd only consider it as a last resort and after fitting a heat recovery unit.
    There is always scope for misinterpretation.

    If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

    Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

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      #3
      I have fitted one of these in my rental property and the tenant is delighted at the results
      http://www.nuaire.co.uk/Product/Resi...ut_Ventilation

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        #4
        Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
        I have fitted one of these in my rental property and the tenant is delighted at the results
        http://www.nuaire.co.uk/Product/Resi...ut_Ventilation
        Hi Snorkerz - could I ask how much this costs? Would it be less than a couple of hundred pounds or is it very expensive?

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          #5
          Off the top of my head - about 250 plus fitting - my tame electrician did it for me.

          edit: just checked £216 inc vat & delivery, but that may have been a special offer.

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            #6
            Well its a solution.

            If the attic is well insulated then the air it pushes in will be cold- it says it is using the heated air in the attic, which it won't be a lot of the year.

            What it's trying to do is creating a change of air- its all very well pushing drier air in, but whatever air is in the house, so it is little different to having windows open in the house.

            Either way it makes the stair well cold and put up heating costs.

            And cold air leads to more condensation, it lowers the temperature and cools surfaces.

            Well fitted doors in the home will also reduce it's effectiveness making a cold stairwell and a possibility of local mould on carpets.

            It's biggest advantage is where a flat or terrace house is hard to get a cross breeze to move air around and air changes in the house.
            Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

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              #7
              Originally posted by Snorkerz View Post
              Off the top of my head - about 250 plus fitting - my tame electrician did it for me.

              edit: just checked £216 inc vat & delivery, but that may have been a special offer.
              Thanks Snorkerz. Just realised not suitable for my property as there isn't an attic (ground floor property).

              I shall see how this winter goes, I have new tenants and have advised them to keep property well ventilated etc and not to dry washing inside the property - all the usual stuff plus I gave them your booklet on condensation and the causes. Have redecorated and added a very expensive antimould chemical to the paint. Fingers crossed!

              Comment


                #8
                You might want to consider a couple of Vent Axia HR25 Solo Plus heat recovery through the wall vent unit.
                There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                Comment


                  #9
                  Some black hole vents may help to keep air moving around the flat. I've used these in flats prone to damp and seen some good results.
                  Ohm sweet Ohm

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I fitted the same unit as Snorkles a little earlier. In my case it has helped but I'll need to do other things too over time as it is an idiosyncratic property - 500 sq ft 1.5 bed 2 up 2 down detached with solid walls, no room having less than 3 outside walls! The next step will probably be a largish in line extractor fan from the kitchen when a conservatory is put on this autumn.

                    I'd say that if the stairwell is noticed as being cold then the unit is set a little too high. I set mine high and reduced it until T was not noticing.

                    For me one advantage of a loft ventilator is that it makes drafts go outwards in the lived-in areas, and the air coming in is less perceptible - so ventilation holes are not blocked up as much.

                    I'm trying to attack this at condensation source, so in my latest project I've provided a separate utility with wash-dry facilities - no washer plumbing anywhere else - and a heat recovery fan.

                    For the OP I'd say consider a heat recovery fan(s) unit with a trickle setting that is as quiet and shifts as much air as possible, and pay attention to the time delay settings.

                    Tenants are less likely to switch it off if it recovers heat and is inaudible. Also make it slightly more difficult to switch off by making the switch (or FCU if you like) not very accessible.

                    Then shave the bottom of some doors by 5mm to create circulation.

                    Next time I will be looking at quieter ones - which will mean in line, or possible 150mm diameter extract tubes, and will mean careful thinking about where to put the gubbins (perhaps a sound insulated unit or roof space).

                    ML
                    Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

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                      #11
                      Originally posted by mk1fan View Post
                      You might want to consider a couple of Vent Axia HR25 Solo Plus heat recovery through the wall vent unit.
                      I've just fitted a Lo-Carbon Tempra fan, which is part of a different Vent Axia range. It fits a 4" hole, and is somewhat more phallic on the outside - so I mounted mine 12" inboard (so to speak).

                      Costs are a bit high - HR25 Solo is about £250, and Lo-Carbon Tempra somewhat under £200.

                      I bagged mine for 30% off in Climate Week this year. There may be another one next March, after you have feedback from your T. Watch for it.

                      http://www.vent-axia.com/news/latest...9-mar-2012.htm

                      ML
                      Refer Mad Regulators to Arkell vs Pressdram.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        I like the Tempra fans to. Indeed the official figures are better than the HR25. The basic models can be sourced for around £170 inc VAT.
                        There is always scope for misinterpretation.

                        If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

                        Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

                        Comment

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