Envirovent humidity controlled kitchen and bathroom fans

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  • Envirovent humidity controlled kitchen and bathroom fans

    Good evening all - has anyone any experience of the effectiveness of the above? My two bedroom ground floor flat has mould caused by condensation, in the main bedroom. The survey has recommended the installation of the above as the bathroom fan is deemed ineffective (to be honest I thought it was when I lived there as it only comes on if the light is turned on, and I always opened the window when showering). And the extractor fan in the kitchen is over the hob and relies on the tenant turning it on. The quote is very expensive but I am willing to invest if they work.

  • #2
    A few months ago I attended a Landlords' course on HHSRS, and Envirovent systems came highly recommended by the person giving the course. Apparently "Nuaire" is another brand of similar devices.

    The trainer also remarked that many local authorities/housing associations put them in where tenants have intractable "lifestyle" problems. They save money in the long term.

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    • #3
      I have one of these by Greenwood Airvac in a shower room in my house - it works fine. You can get one fitted by a builder and it is bound to be cheaper than actually having the Nuaire company do it for you.

      Other make to check out is Expelair - they have a very good website and spares are easily obtained. I always fit fans of one type or other in my lets.

      Since yours is mainly a condensation problem in a bedroom I would seriously consider buying a dehumidifier. This is portable, the size of a shredder and removes water from the air very efficiently - you will be amazed how much. You can leave it on auto or just turn on when required. Best make is Ebac.co.uk but B&Q sell cheaper ones. I recommend buying one suitable for a property bigger than you have. Loads cheaper than fan install and take it with you when you move.



      Freedom at the point of zero............

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      • #4
        Thanks for the responses. I have supplied a good quality dehumidifier which sits unused in the bedroom. You can take a horse to water.... I think it is best if I take it out of the tenants hands. Apart from his inability to open a window he is an excellent tenant and I wouldn't really want to lose him, as previous tenants have had the same inability to crack open a window, but had the added problem of not being able to pay rent or clean. I think I may just bite the extra expense and get them to supply and fit as I have a full time job and a 9 month old baby to contend with and no good building/electrical contacts.

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        • #5
          Humidistat fans do work quite well but curing 'lifestyle related condensation mould' may need more effort. As well as fitting the fans you should ensure that there is sufficient flow of air into the room from the rest of the the property. Usually trimming the bottom of the door to provide a 10mm gap between it and the floor finish is sufficient to allow a good cross draw of air to the fan.

          I would recommend getting the type of fan that has an internal adjustment for the sensitivity. If it's external the tenant will just turn it off.

          Importantly, the tenant must adequately heat the property.
          There is always scope for misinterpretation.

          If my posts can be interpreted in two ways, one that makes you feel angry and one that doesn't, I meant the latter.

          Everyday is an opportunity to learn something new.

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          • #6
            Also, remove and confiscate the shutters from the window trickle-vents

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            • #7
              Originally posted by maxine View Post
              he is an excellent tenant and I wouldn't really want to lose him, as previous tenants have had the same inability to crack open a window
              If that's what you think, you're in for lots of trouble.

              Tenants have to act in way as not to create waste, which is defined as something that is to the detriment of the property (not opening a window) as well taking steps to stop damage from occurring as soon as a tenant sees it or becomes aware of it, like a leaking washing machine or a failed or failing bath/shower seal.

              If a tenant damages the property through totally preventable steps, they should be made to pay.

              Don't compensate for tenant inadequacies - it will always cost you and more than you imagine.

              As to the OPs original point, I would (and have in my property) fit moisture controlled extractors that don't have an external or easily accessible on/off switch and also, to set the sensitivity to a higher than average level, to ensure it kicks in earlier and runs for longer.

              You should also add into your tenancy agreements a clause requiring that the tenant refrain from blocking the extractor openings in any way, unless there is a genuine urgent or emergency need (water pouring through the opening, for example)

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              • #8
                the top of the range fans use the warmth of air being expelled to pre-heat the air being drawn in; and run at the slightest trickle unless the internal humidity rises then boost dramatically. They are expensive to buy but do seem to help defeating condensation and mould and are thereforeworthwhile. Where you are letting old premises with solid brickwork condensation will be a problem that's virtually impossible to cure unless the internal walls are drylined with insulated plasterboard, then skimmed and painted. A big job but there'sno shortcuts; having tried everything I can confirm that all shortcuts are longcuts!

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by quarterday View Post
                  the top of the range fans use the warmth of air being expelled to pre-heat the air being drawn in; and run at the slightest trickle unless the internal humidity rises then boost dramatically. They are expensive to buy but do seem to help defeating condensation and mould and are thereforeworthwhile. Where you are letting old premises with solid brickwork condensation will be a problem that's virtually impossible to cure unless the internal walls are drylined with insulated plasterboard, then skimmed and painted. A big job but there'sno shortcuts; having tried everything I can confirm that all shortcuts are longcuts!
                  One of my clients dealt with in a very sneaky way. He had his boiler engineer rig the boiler to keep the heat on to heat the walls and structure when the tenant was one who turned it off to "save money", including having the lounge rad on and turning over every other rad. Tampered TRV's solved that too, and was a lot cheaper than arguing over condensation problems and the damage it was doing.

                  His engineer only did it as " it's a regular request from landlords"
                  Based on the information posted, I offer my thoughts.Any action you then take is your liability. While commending individual effort, there is no substitute for a thorough review of documents and facts by paid for professional advisers.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I have been dealing with this problem for a while, it's often simple, good quality, correctly
                    sized extractor fan with humidity control set correctly. I've installed many, the difference is amazing, properties that had mould growing in many rooms become dry & mould free, deal with the source & the rest deals with its self. I use good quality units that run quietly, if not the
                    tenant switches them off.

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