Tiles or Vinyl Flooring?

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    Tiles or Vinyl Flooring?

    Hi all,

    I have a room, 25foot by 15foot - it's the kitchen and dining room.

    I was going to get Vinyl flooring - with a nice tile design, as i thought that would be cheapest - but yesterday, i was helping a friend move his new cooker in place - and we put a big rip in it

    Now i'm thinking as a "future landlord" if a tennant does that to my first property - the whole floor will need replacing. With tiles, just a single can be changed.

    BUT - Dropping a can on vinyl will do nothing - but a dropped item on tile will probably mean having to change it. (And then there's pet claws!)

    Please advice me experienced people!

    Porcelain or Ceramic or Vinyl

    Many thanks!

    #2
    I would go for ceramic floor tiles, personally, if that were possible, although they can be tricky to lay properly on wooden floors.

    If it had to be lino type tiles or vinyl flooring, I would go for tiles for the reasons you have already thought of.

    However, if you ask in the 'EPC/repairs/design/improve' forum you are likely to get more answers - this isn't really a planning issue!

    MODERATOR : PLease move. (The thread, I mean, not yourself).
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      This thread has been moved from Planning Forum to Energy Efficiency/EPC, Design, Repair, Improve Forum, as requested.

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        #4
        (Thanks for the move "Moderator")

        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
        I would go for ceramic floor tiles, personally, if that were possible, although they can be tricky to lay properly on wooden floors.
        The house already has very smooth tiles down - so i'm guessing the ceramic tiles could be put stright on them.

        I've never tiled before - so hopefully doing a room that size will give me lots of practice.

        I'm just not sure if the cost of using tiles would be worth it compared to the chance of a tennant ripping the vinyl.

        Can vinyl be repaied - maybe "cut" a tile shape out of the vinyl, and replace a square like that?

        I'm not sure - but thanks for your reply mind the gap

        Hopefully i will get some more replies in this forum.

        Cheers!

        Comment


          #5
          Originally posted by ronb View Post
          Can vinyl be repaired - maybe "cut" a tile shape out of the vinyl, and replace a square like that?
          It's possible; either that way and glueing down the patch and surround, or just by glueing down the ripped area. Never looks great, but bear in mind that this damage is invariably caused by the feet of kitchen appliances as they are fitted/removed, and consequently usually very happens out of sight (as opposed to right in the middle if the floor which would be an eyesore, and risk being scuffed up).

          There is a simple trick to sliding washing machines into a narrow gap under a worktop, where you have little or no 'wiggle-room' above or to the sides, as follows:

          Procure a sheet of hardboard or MDF sheet, 1/4" or 3/8" thick. Should be the same width as the gap, and slightly longer. Place on the floor immediately in front of the gap, and stand your washing machine on it. Sit on the floor immediately in front of this, and using your feet against the front edge of the hardboard, push it back into the gap with the machine on top - it should slide in pretty readily. Once it's in situ, you can slide the hardboard out again.

          Comment


            #6
            Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post

            There is a simple trick to sliding washing machines into a narrow gap under a worktop, where you have little or no 'wiggle-room' above or to the sides, as follows:

            Procure a sheet of hardboard or MDF sheet, 1/4" or 3/8" thick. Should be the same width as the gap, and slightly longer. Place on the floor immediately in front of the gap, and stand your washing machine on it. Sit on the floor immediately in front of this, and using your feet against the front edge of the hardboard, push it back into the gap with the machine on top - it should slide in pretty readily. Once it's in situ, you can slide the hardboard out again.
            Cool.

            What do you do with the sheet of hardboard afterwards, Eric?
            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

            Comment

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