Would tenants prefer electric or gas cooker/heating?

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    Would tenants prefer electric or gas cooker/heating?

    Dear all,

    I am in the process of converting my property into 4 flats and am considering the merits, or otherwise of gas vs electric flats. My contractor's quote gives me an option of either gas or electric.

    The electric option adds about £9k to overall costs (electric cooker to three of the flat, the Ground floor flat will continue to have gas from the existing single phase supply).

    The gas option will ad c£13k to total costs and each flat will have its own gas supply, with a gas hob etc.

    I was wondering what peoples opinions are. I spoke to a landlord who converted his prpoerty and did electrics throughout as he said this saved on the cost of a gas safetly certificate each year. My brother is attracted to the idea of the electric option as, in his words, this eliminates the worry of a tenant leaving the gas on.

    I have also met a number of people who prefer gas hobs to electric ones, so I also need to consider the needs of my tenants (I am aiming for young professionals). Someone also said that bills for an all electric flat can be very high - is this true?

    We are also planning on having central heating installed in the flats, does this not mean that we will have to have gas or can the central heating system also be electric?

    Id be grateful for any thoughts and experiences on these points.

    Many thanks

    Sal

    #2
    I agree that most people, given the choice, would opt to cook on gas because it's more controllable. However the advantages of not having gas in a rental flat (not least the £4000 difference in installation costs), in my opinion outweigh the advantages.

    Consider providing a halogen hob with the money you save? They are quicker and more controllable to cook on (and easy to clean) than normal electric hobs.
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

    Comment


      #3
      Cooking on electricity is safer, cleaner, cheaper, and more controllable.
      JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
      1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
      2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
      3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
      4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

      Comment


        #4
        Originally posted by salblue22 View Post
        I have also met a number of people who prefer gas hobs to electric ones, so I also need to consider the needs of my tenants (I am aiming for young professionals). Someone also said that bills for an all electric flat can be very high - is this true?

        We are also planning on having central heating installed in the flats, does this not mean that we will have to have gas or can the central heating system also be electric?
        I would go with halogen hobs and gas central heating.

        I doubt that an electric hob is substantially more expensive to run than a gas hob, but electricity is certainly more expensive than gas when it comes to central heating. And even if you could find an energy-efficient means to electrically heat the flats, tenants would probably perceive it as being more expensive to run unless you provided evidence proving otherwise. I've also never seen an attractive storage heater (though I'm sure they exist, and there's always underfloor heating...)

        People do generally prefer gas hobs to electric, but I think it matters less when it's a rental. Young professionals don't cook as much as families, go out more/buy convenience foods more, and halogen hobs are easier to clean.

        Comment


          #5
          p.s. I don't know whether this is an absurd suggestion, but it might be possible to have communal gas central heating/hot water, perhaps a giant boiler located in the attic, which would eliminate the gas safety inspections. But would also mean that when it went wrong, you'd have four unhappy tenants on your hands...

          Comment


            #6
            Would T prefer electric or gas cooker?

            I am doing up a house to rent out. The current Gas supply to the cooker in steel and I would need to upgrade that to copper, if I was to use gas for the cooker.

            But then I thought, wouldn't it be simpler to get electric cooker and hob?

            What do you lot thing about electric cooker in a rental property. I've never used electric, so no idea if they any good or not.

            Comment


              #7
              I personally dislike electric cookers, but have houses with both types and have never had anyone decline to rent because of an electric cooker.

              I'd go with the cheapest option, which sounds like electric so you don't have to re-pipe the gas.

              And if your property is electrically heated you'll do away with gas cert :-)

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jghomer View Post
                I personally dislike electric cookers, but have houses with both types and have never had anyone decline to rent because of an electric cooker.

                I'd go with the cheapest option, which sounds like electric so you don't have to re-pipe the gas.

                And if your property is electrically heated you'll do away with gas cert :-)
                I agree with the above; except that electric may well be a more expensive option as for a hob a dedicated electrical circuit will be needed, so may require some rewiring to be done if not already present (whereas it sounds as if the gas is already in place. more or less).

                Comment


                  #9
                  An electric cooker is always the best option in a rented property as no annual, expensive "Gas Safe" inspection is required. Of course, such an inspection can be tagged onto an inspection for a gas heating system at little extra cost, but unless other gas appliances are installed, a gas cooker will cost at least £50 per annum in inspection costs!

                  P.P.
                  Any information given in this post is based on my personal experience as a landlord, what I have learned from this and other boards and elsewhere. It is not to be relied on. Definitive advice is only available from a Solicitor or other appropriately qualified person.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I prefer an electric cooker- safer, and nothing to blow out in a draught either.
                    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                    Comment


                      #11
                      gas for heating definetily

                      Although electric is the cheaper option, gas is cheaper in the long run, running costs are far lower = happier tenants, and when the boiler breaks down (they always do!) finding a gas man is easier than having an electric one repaired - I know I am gas safe registered and one of my ll's have a property with electric boiler and we are about to bin it before winter comes.......

                      Comment


                        #12
                        for ease of use convenience and warmth - gas gas and gas. We have calor in a property with no mains gas (and in our home) because it is so much better than electricity. Gas hob, electric oven every time.
                        Unshackled by the chains of idle vanity, A modest manatee, that's me

                        Comment


                          #13
                          gas hobs are far more attractive for cooking, when I was a student that was something I always looked for when renting a place. with heating however I've read that many people actually prefere electric heaters. This article on central heaters vs electric heaters definatly seems to suggst electric. I hope that helps.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            My property has gas central heating and an electric hob! Never had any complaints or anyone put off by the fact.

                            Comment


                              #15
                              It can depend on the kind of tenants you have. Students don't care either way as long as it works. Gas is not such a good idea in HMOs full of individual Ts (as opposed to a family or a group of friends) as it carries a higher risk of fire/explosion. People who like cooking generally prefer gas, or ceramic/halogen but not electricity, given the choice. I agree with islandgirl : gas hob, + electric fan oven.
                              'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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