Kitchen Worktop Suitable for Student Property?

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    #16
    Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
    You are forgetting that the 'washing-up function' in students' hands/arms is largely vestigial these days. And no doubt if they did use the sink they would slop so much water over the side the entire work surface would swell, not just the bit above the dishwasher.

    Come on, you can surely do better than that?

    Vicious lies!!!

    I had a dishwasher in badflat and I never used it. I'm fairly certain it still contained waste from the previous tenant when I left.

    Dishwashers are quite expensive to run so I prefer hand washing everything.

    You're right about the work surface though, the one near the sink had swollen up but I think it had more to do with bad kitchen layout than water spraying mayhem.

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      #17
      Originally posted by roryl View Post

      You're right about the work surface though, the one near the sink had swollen up but I think it had more to do with bad kitchen layout than water spraying mayhem.
      In what way do you think the kitchen layout was poor, please, rory?
      'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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        #18
        Originally posted by Telometer View Post
        Best kitchen surface I ever had was my last house which had an early 1980s kitchen with "quarry tiles" on the worksurfaces as well as the floor. Problem is, these are set onto chipboard, as would be your paving stones.
        Perhaps one could use marine ply as a base? And epoxy grout instead of the regular stuff.

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          #19
          Originally posted by westminster View Post
          Perhaps one could use marine ply as a base? And epoxy grout instead of the regular stuff.
          Now that is a good suggestion. Thanks.
          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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            #20
            Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
            In what way do you think the kitchen layout was poor, please, rory?
            Everything was squeezed into one corner, there was mountains of space but I imagine for cost reasons the sink and water-using appliances were in one area (near the water source).

            I think one of the reasons for the warping of work surface in the flat I rented was due to poor installation. The sink was less than an inch away from where the two pieces of work top joined together making it near impossible for it not to swell up after a while (afaik the kitchen was about 5 years old).

            If you have problems with your next work top swelling up, you could consider removing the dishwasher. I stayed in halls and there wasn't a dishwasher (and it was a new build, en suite rooms, flat style layout) so I don't think many students expect a dishwasher. It would also save on electricity and water bills and the weekly shop. Of course, if you're finding student are demanding a dishwasher you should keep it in and install those paving slabs.

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              #21
              Originally posted by roryl View Post
              The sink was less than an inch away from where the two pieces of work top joined together making it near impossible for it not to swell up after a while (afaik the kitchen was about 5 years old).
              Same as in my own kitchen (about 9 yrs old, with very ordinary laminated worktop) - we have no problem at all with it, as the joint is completely sealed: and certainly it is regularly dowsed with water!

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                #22
                Originally posted by Ericthelobster View Post
                it is regularly dowsed with water!

                A Y- or L-shaped twig or rod, called a dowsing rod, divining rod (Latin: virgula divina or baculus divinatorius) or witching rod is sometimes used during dowsing, although some dowsers use other equipment or no equipment at all.
                A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                W.Churchill

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                  #23
                  saving energy/money
                  Originally posted by roryl View Post

                  If you have problems with your next work top swelling up, you could consider removing the dishwasher. I stayed in halls and there wasn't a dishwasher (and it was a new build, en suite rooms, flat style layout) so I don't think many students expect a dishwasher. It would also save on electricity and water bills and the weekly shop. Of course, if you're finding student are demanding a dishwasher you should keep it in and install those paving slabs.
                  Students in Jesmond pay higher rents than elsewhere in Newcastle and they do expect a higher standard of accommodation. For this reason I am disinclined to remove the dishwasher, although I agree it would be worth checking to see whether steam is escaping mid-cycle.

                  I don't buy the argument about washing up by hand saving energy/money, actually. As long as the dishwasher is stacked correctly and only run when full, it actually uses less hot water and detergent than doing three or four lots (or more) separately through the day.
                  'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                    #24
                    Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
                    A Y- or L-shaped twig or rod, called a dowsing rod, divining rod (Latin: virgula divina or baculus divinatorius) or witching rod is sometimes used during dowsing, although some dowsers use other equipment or no equipment at all.
                    Are you Jeffrey in disguise?
                    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                      #25
                      Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                      I don't buy the argument about washing up by hand saving energy/money, actually. As long as the dishwasher is stacked correctly and only run when full, it actually uses less hot water and detergent than doing three or four lots (or more) separately through the day.
                      But who washes up take-away trays and chip wrappings anyway?
                      I also post as Moderator2 when moderating

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by mind the gap View Post

                        I don't buy the argument about washing up by hand saving energy/money, actually. As long as the dishwasher is stacked correctly and only run when full, it actually uses less hot water and detergent than doing three or four lots (or more) separately through the day.
                        ..it would seem you are overlooking the fact that all dishes, plates etc must be rinsed and pretty much cleaned before they are pt in DW, failure to do so will leave you with not properly DWashed plates etc.
                        This uses a lot of running HW before DW does its stuff.

                        If students they probably only actually use the DW after several days when they have run out of plates. At this point the use of a chisel or kango hammer is required to "rindse" plate before DW does the rest.

                        On the subject of kango hammers, most teenage boys require one of these to remove the sheet from their bed once a quarter.
                        A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                        W.Churchill

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                          #27
                          Originally posted by Mars Mug View Post
                          But who washes up take-away trays and chip wrappings anyway?
                          Precisely!

                          So there shouldn't be any steam involved at all, on that logic...!

                          It's a Communist plot!
                          'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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                            #28
                            Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
                            ..it would seem you are overlooking the fact that all dishes, plates etc must be rinsed and pretty much cleaned before they are pt in DW, failure to do so will leave you with not properly DWashed plates etc.
                            This uses a lot of running HW before DW does its stuff.

                            If students they probably only actually use the DW after several days when they have run out of plates. At this point the use of a chisel or kango hammer is required to "rindse" plate before DW does the rest.

                            On the subject of kango hammers, most teenage boys require one of these to remove the sheet from their bed once a quarter.
                            The stuff about rinsing them first is a myth. Strangely, my sister-in-law (also in South Wales like you!) is the only person I know who actually does that. We have always scraped plates (into bin/cat's bowl/birdtable or wherever) but never rinsed them, even when they are clarted up with grease, egg, etc. It is totally unnecessary as they always come out of the dishwasher beautifully clean.

                            Try it! Free yourself from these shackles! Just bung the bloody things in the machine and press the button!
                            'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

                            Comment


                              #29
                              Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
                              The stuff about rinsing them first is a myth. Strangely, my sister-in-law (also in South Wales like you!) is the only person I know who actually does that. We have always scraped plates (into bin/cat's bowl/birdtable or wherever) but never rinsed them, even when they are clarted up with grease, egg, etc. It is totally unnecessary as they always come out of the dishwasher beautifully clean.

                              Try it! Free yourself from these shackles! Just bung the bloody things in the machine and press the button!
                              I spend a considerable amount of time putting things back into the dishwasher for the stated reason - worst culprit is weetabix. ...don't go there with the it's a crap DW, this has been going on for as long as i have had DWs, Zanussi, hotpoint and latest one is ,12mth Smeg...

                              It can't just be me anyone else have this problem ?
                              A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity; an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty.
                              W.Churchill

                              Comment


                                #30
                                Originally posted by Rodent1 View Post
                                I spend a considerable amount of time putting things back into the dishwasher for the stated reason - worst culprit is weetabix. ...don't go there with the it's a crap DW, this has been going on for as long as i have had DWs, Zanussi, hotpoint and latest one is ,12mth Smeg...

                                It can't just be me anyone else have this problem ?
                                Are you cleaning the filter regularly enough?

                                The only time our students' DW didn't clean properly was when - for some unknown reason - they removed the rotor arms from inside it, and stored them in the broom cupboard. They thought it was amazing when we replaced them and the thing worked properly again.

                                (But I do agree, Weetabix is like Araldite. My son used to stick his head to the table with it most mornings, when small).
                                'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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