T finds house draughty- can L be forced to insulate it?

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    #31
    The HHSRS guidelines suggest:
    A healthy indoor temperature is around 21°C. There is small risk of health effects below 19°C. Below 16°C, there are serious health risks for the elderly, including greatly increased risks of respiratory and cardiovascular conditions. Below 10°C a great risk of hypothermia, especially for the elderly.

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      #32
      If you speak to the council evo officer they will tell you what they class as acceptable heating and what temp it has to maintain.

      They will visit a property if requested and if it isnt acceptable they then can class it as a cat 1 hazard. This in my expirenance normally makes a LL upgrade the heating. I havent yet had a LL want a T out because of it.

      But to rectify the problem most LL just put in the min to comply which is a cheap convector heater fixed (plug in) to the wall which has a timer and can be themostaticlly controlled.
      It has to be the right size one for the room though.

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        #33
        Originally posted by johnboy View Post
        If you speak to the council evo officer they will tell you what they class as acceptable heating and what temp it has to maintain.

        They will visit a property if requested and if it isnt acceptable they then can class it as a cat 1 hazard. This in my expirenance normally makes a LL upgrade the heating. I havent yet had a LL want a T out because of it.

        But to rectify the problem most LL just put in the min to comply which is a cheap convector heater fixed (plug in) to the wall which has a timer and can be themostaticlly controlled.
        It has to be the right size one for the room though.
        It might be cheap to buy the heater but it will cost the tenant a fortune to use it.
        'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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          #34
          Originally posted by mind the gap View Post
          It might be cheap to buy the heater but it will cost the tenant a fortune to use it.
          Yes I know but a lot of LL will put one in for £50 or £60 rather then spend £200 to £300 for a night storage heater which then have to be wired in by a sparky.

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            #35
            Jonboy, Legion,

            The CIBSE Guide recommends 21°C in living rooms, 22°C in bathrooms, 18°C in bedrooms and 16°C in hallways etc.

            HHSRS Guidance is based on CIBSE recommendations, but very much simplified for use for EHO's who don't, after all, have the detailed knowledge and understanding that surveyors and building services engineers do. They just need quick and dirty answer for their tick box rating.

            Also, note that the above are resultant dry bulb temparatures. The HHSRS Guidance doesn't even explain the important of humidity, but it is humidity, rather than temperature, which reduces dust mites.

            Don't ever be afraid to challenge an EHO, in court even. They may be used toi getting their own way but they often don't know much about what they are talking about. Not thier fault, they are not experts in building or building services after all.
            NOTE: Steven Palmer BSc (Hons) MRICS MBEng is an official LandlordZONE Topic Expert and a Director of Davisons Palmer Lim Any advice given by Steven in this Forum is of a general nature only and should not be acted upon without first obtaining advice specific to your problem/situation from a professional.

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