Landlord's EPC required- what is point?

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    Landlord's EPC required- what is point?

    I have seen this in the paper today and as a landlord with three properties, I seriously cannot see the point of the EPC. They are a waste of time for new properties (my day job!) so why now lettings? Are this government determined to get every last penny out of us by any means possible?!

    What benefit to a tenant is this going to have? I pay all the bills for my properties and a set amount is charged to the tenant. I am not going to invest in wind turbines, solar heating or an extra jumper for the tenants, so how is this going to help me find a tenant?

    The following was taken from this link
    http://www.greene.co.uk/home/news/en...cates-for-land

    WHY DO I NEED AN EPC?

    Prospective tenants will be able to see how energy efficient and environmental friendly your properties are. If you have invested in energy saving measures, you will ultimately save the tenant money on utility bills and your property is more likely to be let.


    I have no issues letting my properties as they are in a great location and they are among the best in the area - that way I can always rent them. None of my tenants query the rent or bills so why do they now need to now the energy rating to make a decision?

    Maybe the government should just ban landlords - then they can have the problem of finding homes for all the tenants out there. And before anyone says it - not everyone wants to own a home!

    At the moment, I don't see why I bother.....

    #2
    If you read back through the threads on this forum relating to EPCs for rental properties, you will find all the arguments (for and against) set out, disputed, debated, chucked around, gnawed at and wound up.

    (Personally, I would have thought the wider benefits were stark-staringly obvious, but, as you've obviously made your mind up anyway, why bother asking?!)
    'Pause you who read this, and think for a moment of the long chain of iron or gold, of thorns or flowers, that would never have bound you, but for the formation fo the first link on one memorable day'. Charles Dickens, Great Expectations

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      #3
      I have read the forums thoroughly as I want to know how this is going to benefit my tenants and myself?

      Given that nobody asks to see the EPC when buying a new property (as I said that is my day job) why are they going to be interested when they are renting?

      So far, EPC's have told me to use energy efficient light bulbs and install solar panels. What am I supposed to do for an apartment? Most people are reluctant to pay ground rent and service charge, let alone money towards a solar heating system.

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        #4
        Originally posted by robyoung View Post
        I have read the forums thoroughly as I want to know how this is going to benefit my tenants and myself?

        Given that nobody asks to see the EPC when buying a new property (as I said that is my day job) why are they going to be interested when they are renting?

        So far, EPC's have told me to use energy efficient light bulbs and install solar panels. What am I supposed to do for an apartment? Most people are reluctant to pay ground rent and service charge, let alone money towards a solar heating system.

        Quote from EST


        New research from the Energy Saving Trust reveals that energy efficient homes will be essential to keep the property market moving.

        The study reveals that half of UK homeowners believe that homes with greener features are easier to sell in the current market. Over half (53 per cent) of all householders say they would be willing to pay extra for them. Indeed, on average, householders are willing to pay £3,350 more for a 'green' home.

        The research forms part of our new Hidden value guide, which details how each of us can add value to our homes by installing a range of energy saving, water conservation and waste reduction measures.

        It makes sense, in the current economic climate, to ensure that the running costs of the home you are living in or buying are as low as possible - and, of course, you will be helping to cut down on your carbon dioxide emissions (CO2 emissions).

        END
        Visit my - news and articles
        - resources, news and services
        - information, FAQ and provision

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          #5
          As more buildings are assessed with a rating, I can see a useful tax being imposed. Or am I just being a cynic?

          Daivid

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            #6
            At the end of the day I've paid as little as £45.00 inc VAT for my EPC's a cost of practically sod all a month per property.

            I have seen people not take a four bedroom house (high ceilings, old boiler, old radiators, no double galzing) because of the potential costs of the fuel bills. If it makes that landlord think about putting in a new energy efficient boiler that I've been telling him to do for the last year then all the better.

            The people making the most fuss are the people who know they need to do improvements and have known for a long time but suffer from long pocket-short arm syndrome.

            The people I feel sorry for are the landlords with property 2 years old that wouldnt have had a EPC from the builder. i've just had one come back and say that if I carried out a couple of the improvements the score would decrease by 1 point. Now that just seems stupid.
            My views and posts are based on my opinion and any advice given is just that, advice. If you decide to act on any advice given it is with the full knowledge that I am not perfect and anything I say could be wrong!

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              #7
              Originally posted by hip-consultant.co.uk View Post
              Quote from EST

              New research from the Energy Saving Trust reveals that energy efficient homes will be essential to keep the property market moving.
              Now there's a surprise. Good job that EST is impartial, isn't it.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

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                #8
                Originally posted by robyoung View Post
                I have read the forums thoroughly as I want to know how this is going to benefit my tenants and myself?

                Given that nobody asks to see the EPC when buying a new property (as I said that is my day job) why are they going to be interested when they are renting?

                So far, EPC's have told me to use energy efficient light bulbs and install solar panels. What am I supposed to do for an apartment? Most people are reluctant to pay ground rent and service charge, let alone money towards a solar heating system.

                You say NEW PROPERTY is your day job, then why are you asking this sort of question, you should know why.

                NEW PROPERTY does have a energy report called SAP, you should know this.

                Read the EPC it advices on much more than energy lights and solar panels. You may notice it gives adice on windows, walls, loft insulation, heating, boiler, controls, gas, electric, lighting.............................
                1st Call DEA

                *Domestic Energy Assessor / Home Information Packs
                *Home Energy Surveys
                *Rented Property Energy Certificates

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