Electric Heating becoming unaffordable?

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    Electric Heating becoming unaffordable?

    Although the 54% increase in utilities announced yesterday was bad news for everyone, anyone on electric heating is going to be hit even harder. The cost of electricity has increased much faster than gas over the past 10 years, mostly because of the green taxes that have been loaded onto them. An increase of 54% for the people using storage heaters, panel heaters & eco radiators will equate to a much bigger monetary rise than those using gas.

    About half my properties have electric heating and I have been of a mind to sell them because they will be very difficult to get to an EPC C due to the cost. Now I am pretty certain I will have to sell them because tenants won't be able to afford to heat them - even though they produce much less CO2 and should be part of the NetZero solution!

    Boris & his NetZero 2050 agenda are going to put an untold extra financial burden on the ordinary people in this country and increase homelessness all in the name of saving the planet!

    Does anyone remember voting for this madness?


    #2
    An American guy on Zerohedge this morning identified the problem quite well: It's demolishing all our coal fired power stations and being reliant on imported gas. (I did not vote for that either.)
    ZeroHedge - On a long enough timeline, the survival rate for everyone drops to zero
    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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      #3
      I have two properties which are also full electric and i agree there is no way at the moment to get them to a C...... with what you have also said about the cost of running them i think selling them sooner than i thought may be the best plan.

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        #4
        Need to reopen a few of our coal mines and burn it to produce electricity

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          #5
          Originally posted by Neelix View Post
          Need to reopen a few of our coal mines and burn it to produce electricity
          We also have gas and oil reserves which we should use instead of importing it!

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            #6
            And they still haven't learned. We're at the mercy of global prices because we've outsourced our power supply. Haven't they realised they're doing the same with food and no doubt the results will be similar.

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              #7
              Originally posted by royw View Post
              And they still haven't learned. We're at the mercy of global prices because we've outsourced our power supply. Haven't they realised they're doing the same with food and no doubt the results will be similar.
              Totally agree, we have had a collection of worthless politicians over the decades whom have simply thought of their own future and not what is best in the long term for the whole country, we have made pitiful attempts to protect ourselves with having more storage for gas etc and as you say using what natural resources we have all around us, yes let us expoit the green avenues we have, why not.... but that does not mean we totally stop with the fossil fuel side, not until the green side can take over.

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                #8
                I was considering replacing a gas boiler with an electric one. I guess that’s a stupid idea now. I have tweeted Greg Hands MP for energy about this. The cynic in me suspects it is another way to get landlords to sell up their properties.

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                  #9
                  Originally posted by clairol View Post
                  IThe cynic in me suspects it is another way to get landlords to sell up their properties.
                  I need no further pushing from the govt, i am selling up, it is just too much for me and i can use the massive gains i have made to enjoy the remainder of my life after my retirement, spend it or someone else will.

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                    #10
                    Anyone looked at Uswitch lately? You're in for a shock if you do.

                    Luckily for the time being, I am on a 3 year EDF fixed rate. This works out at £1845 pa. Putting my figures into Uswitch, the cheapest 2 year fix is £4697 pa!

                    (Gas is 11p per unit, E7 night is 28p per unit, E7 day is 39p per unit.)
                    To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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                      #11
                      I think we are all in for a massive shock and unlike some, i think this is not going away anytime soon, i have a worrying feeling we could see civil unreast towards the end of the year or so.

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                        #12
                        The green levies on domestic fuel need to be suspended ASAP

                        and remember it was Ed Milliband who introduced these

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                          #13
                          What about these "100% Renewable Energy" tariffs?

                          I haven't seen the cost of wind or sunlight going up, so presumably those 'Green' tariffs should stay the same.

                          Fat chance of that I suspect.

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                            #14
                            Originally posted by nukecad View Post
                            What about these "100% Renewable Energy" tariffs?

                            I haven't seen the cost of wind or sunlight going up, so presumably those 'Green' tariffs should stay the same.

                            Fat chance of that I suspect.
                            I believe the price paid to the generators is the price of the most expensive source. Someone's making out like a bandit, with a system like that, eh?
                            To save them chiming in, JPKeates, Theartfullodger, Boletus, Mindthegap, Macromia, Holy Cow & Ted.E.Bear think the opposite of me on almost every subject.

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                              #15
                              From the relevant Minister to my MP. I hear it might be 2030 for C rating requirement. Anyone else heard the same? Let’s hope that we get this sensible reprieve. Seems I will have to stick with installing gas boilers in the meantime & possibly even remove the electric on I have installed….

                              Rt Hon Grant Shapps MP House of Commons London
                              SW1A 0AA
                              Dear Grant,
                              Rt Hon Kwasi Kwarteng MP Secretary of State Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy 1 Victoria Street
                              London SW1H 0ET
                              T +44 (0) 20 7215 5000 E enquiries@beis.gov.uk W www.gov.uk
                              Our ref: MCB2022/04902 Your ref:
                              28 March 2022
                              Thank you for your email dated 25 February enclosing correspondence from your constituent, regarding concerns with using EPCs as a tool to assess the carbon footprint of properties.
                              The Government committed in the Clean Growth Strategy to improve as many homes as possible to EPC Band C by 2035 and as many private rental homes as possible to EPC band C by 2030 where practical, affordable and cost effective. As you know, the Government recently consulted on raising the maximum spend landlords are required to invest to £10,000, with the proposed requirements applying to new tenancies from 1 April 2025 and to all tenancies by 1 April 2028. The consultation also sought views on the merits of an affordability exemption. BEIS officials are finalising the policy design and will be publishing a Government Response in due course.
                              EPCs use an Energy Efficiency Rating (EER) to measure the energy performance of buildings based on their estimated running costs and generate recommendations to improve this rating. EPCs also produce an Environmental Impact Rating (EIR) to score buildings based on their estimated CO2 emissions, but it is the EER which determines the overall EPC rating. Since energy costs can be a significant outlay it is important that homeowners and occupiers are aware of the running costs of their building. Using the EER ensures that any recommendations generated by the EPC lead to a reduction in energy costs. Using the EER also encourages measures that reduce energy demand, such as insulation, leading to a reduction in both running costs and CO2e emissions. However, given the higher cost of electricity relative to gas, the presence of an electrical heating component, such as an air source heat pump, may result in a lower EER without additional measures to reduce energy demand. We are considering this issue in the context of our final policy design for EPC C requirements for landlords.
                              Regarding Ms Ashby’s point that EPC scoring makes the switch from gas boilers to greener electric ones more difficult, the Heat and Buildings Strategy sets out a framework to support a gradual transition away from the installation of new natural gas boilers for heating homes, in line with our net zero target.
                              Our aim is to end the installation of new natural gas boilers by 2035 so that we remain on track to deliver net zero in 2050. This approach aligns with natural replacement cycles, as natural gas boilers typically have a lifespan of about 15

                              years. Even from 2035, we are not asking consumers to replace fully-functional boilers, instead we aim that when consumers plan to replace their heating source, they replace it with a low-carbon heat source, or, in areas where we know hydrogen will play a future role, a low-carbon ready appliance such as a hydrogen ready boiler, that can be converted to a low carbon fuel supply in future. We remain committed to working with industry to keep costs down and making sure energy prices are fair and affordable while incentivising consumers towards sustainable choices in line with our net zero ambitions. We will launch a Fairness and Affordability Call for Evidence on options for energy levies and obligations to help rebalance electricity and gas prices and to support green choices, with a view to taking decisions this year.
                              On Ms Ashby’s concern of private landlords being singled out by proposals for the private rented sector, it is important to highlight that we committed in the Net Zero Strategy to consult on phasing in higher minimum energy performance standards to ensure all homes reach EPC Band C, where cost effective, practical, and affordable. This includes social housing and homeowners.

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