HIPs for New Build Homes

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    HIPs for New Build Homes

    I am buying a new build home which will be ready next month, but have been told by the developer that a HIP is not required for it as it will have NHBC. Is this correct?

    #2
    Originally posted by Rob10 View Post
    I am buying a new build home which will be ready next month, but have been told by the developer that a HIP is not required for it as it will have NHBC. Is this correct?
    No, NHBC is a protection for P in case building work defects are not rectified by builder.
    HIPS is an all-properties imposition (new houses as well as old) and has no overlap with NHBC.
    JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
    1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
    2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
    3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
    4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

    Comment


      #3
      Thank you.

      Now for a chat with the grumpy sales lady who was adamant that the property wouldn't need one, and that they wouldn't be providing one.

      Comment


        #4
        Hi Rob
        All new houses require a HIP.
        The only difference is that a house built to pre 2006 building regulations will have an EPC(Energy Performance Certificate based on RdSAP in it, whilst a house built to 2006 Building regulations may have a PEA(predicted energy assessment) until it is complete, and then the EPC will be by a different method known as SAP. The EPC will still look the same and have the same info in it. A house built to 2006 Regs may also have a PEA.

        RdSAP and SAP are just different methods of getting to same end result, and are just different software procedures into which data about the house is input.

        The NHBC guarantee is for the building of the house - ie any defects should be remedied by the builder.

        The minimum the builder is reuired to supply you with to comply with HIP legislation is:
        Index
        Sale Statement
        Evidence of Title
        EPC(or PEA until property complete)
        Water and drainage Searches
        Local searches including planning and local land charges

        Hope this answers your questions

        Jane Needham
        To the best of my knowledge the information I supply is accurate but I do not accept liability except for paying clients You always advised to take professional advice before acting.
        Jane Needham

        Whilst the advice given is believed to be correct, I hold no liability for any actions taken on the basis of the advice.

        Comment


          #5
          Out of interest, Is the developer an individual or a large (famous) company who should know better?

          Comment


            #6
            Thank you, yes that does help.

            And yes, they are a large developer who should know better!

            Comment


              #7
              Originally posted by Rob10 View Post
              Thank you, yes that does help.

              And yes, they are a large developer who should know better!
              Perhaps:
              a. the company does know; but
              b. its grumpy saleswoman does not.
              JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
              1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
              2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
              3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
              4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                Perhaps:
                a. the company does know; but
                b. its grumpy saleswoman does not.
                I am sure this will be the case. Saleswoman should know though.

                Comment


                  #9
                  NHBC do provide HIPs for new build so maybe this is where she is getting confused.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    I have been back to the developer, who are still insisting that the property does not require a HIP. I was informed that this was to do with the property having been build to the new 2006 Building Regulations, and also, that it was marketed before 6 April this year.

                    Very confused.

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Originally posted by Rob10 View Post
                      I have been back to the developer, who are still insisting that the property does not require a HIP. I was informed that this was to do with the property having been build to the new 2006 Building Regulations, and also, that it was marketed before 6 April this year.

                      Very confused.
                      The latter point is significant, but start date for HIPS depends on how many bedrooms there are.
                      JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                      1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                      2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                      3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                      4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Originally posted by jeffrey View Post
                        The latter point is significant, but start date for HIPS depends on how many bedrooms there are.
                        There are 2 bedrooms

                        Comment


                          #13
                          I understand that, from 14 December 2007, every sale (no matter how few bedroms in house) is within scheme EXCEPT a property:
                          a. then already on the open market; or
                          b. never on the open market; or
                          c. a let property.

                          So your grumpy saleslady is right only if it was already for sale before 141207 (not just 060408, to which your post #10 refers).
                          JEFFREY SHAW, solicitor [and Topic Expert], Nether Edge Law*
                          1. Public advice is believed accurate, but I accept no legal responsibility except to direct-paying private clients.
                          2. Telephone advice: see http://www.landlordzone.co.uk/forums/showthread.php?t=34638.
                          3. For paid advice about conveyancing/leaseholds/L&T, contact me* and become a private client.
                          4. *- Contact info: click on my name (blue-highlight link).

                          Comment

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