Advice on conservatory

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  • Piffy
    replied
    I also have a conservatory which is very cold in the winter. It has large stone flags on the floor which obviously are very cold to the touch.
    I am considering putting carpets down so that should help.

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  • Another Fine Mess
    replied
    I have a 20 year old conservatory and it is also freezing in the winter. It also has a thin polycarbonate roof. Although it had a 6ft small single skin radiator which was useless as it was not big enough to warm the room up. I had a 10ft double skin radiator fitted (with thermostat) and it is big enough to overcome the cold. I would replace the radiator and if they complain about the cost of heating just say that conservatories are more costly to heat.

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  • andybenw
    replied
    There is no need for a thermostatic valve to turn the radiator off, just a normal on/off valve. If it's seized then closing the lockshield valve with a spanner on the other end of the radiator will do the same job of turning the radiator off.

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  • poochhq
    replied
    Thanks. Those are both very helpful replies. The tenant wants to turn the radiator off as they are unable to use the conservatory and they are worried about wasting heat and money!

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  • ash72
    replied
    You have a duty to fix the leak, you don't need to do anything with the radiator valve, as you provided an EPC of the property to the T (I'm assuming) therefore they know the rating and energy performance of the house.

    If they want to use it, and it's too cold, tell them they can get a portable heater. I'm assuming you have a main thermostat in the house which controls the heating to all rooms. Seems like a little strange that they are complaining it's too cold then they are complaining they can't turn off that radiator, I would prefer to have it on as it's more likely to be prone to freezing pipes (I would remind them of this).

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  • alice123
    replied
    I dont think anyone ever uses their conservatory in the winter - its meant for summer isnt it ?
    I have two both are damp and back on ive got water coming in -
    I dont have any form of heating in there -

    Both conservatories are around 20 years old -

    I personally would fix the radiator - but why has it no valve ? is it a feeder one ?

    my leaking one too has a polycarbonate roof -
    but i cant imagine someone sitting in the conserve in the winter months -

    Apart from having underfloor heating and insulating the roof I dont think there is a lot more you can do -

    I would say you are responsible for the leak in the roof . But I wouldnt go so far as to say its your responsibility to make sure its warmer than the job its supposed to do -
    but thats my opinion anyway and Im certainly not very experienced in this field
    apart from that you could invest in the latest -

    https://www.ultraframe-conservatorie...servatory-Roof

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  • poochhq
    started a topic Advice on conservatory

    Advice on conservatory

    I am renting out a house that has a conservatory on the back of it. The latest tenants are complaining that they haven't been able the conservatory lately because it has been too cold. And they are shocked that they can't use it year round. The conservatory is about 20 years old. It has a radiator in it but whilst it has proper UPVC door and windows, it only has a thin plastic roof polycarbonate roof. The tenants are complaining about a small leak in the roof (which I have offered to fix) and that they can't turn the radiator off (because it doesn't have a thermostatic valve.) When they viewed the house we didn't discuss the conservatory in any specific detail. The house has been rented out for the past 6 years and it was never an issue with any of the previous tenants. What am I responsible and liable for? Thanks,

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