Recommendations for avoiding mould growth?

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    Recommendations for avoiding mould growth?

    Hi all!

    I currently let two rooms in my house and am a live in landlord

    One of the issues I have every winter/autumn is mould starts to form on the walls in both rooms (and in some places, the carpets near the skirting boards), as the lodgers keep their doors and windows closed, due to the cold.
    I fitted vents on the bedroom doors, as the rest of the house is fine (We use a dehumidifier in the kitchen which keeps the moisture level below 60), but it has no effects on their bedrooms, despite the vents.
    Each room has an air brick in it, which is clear, as well.
    Can anyone recommend any options to help with this? None of the lodgers we've had in the past 8 or so years have ever bothered to alert us to the mould or to clear it off the paintwork/carpets themselves, which is frustrating.

    #2
    Is the place being properly heated (for example 20C at day at say 17C at night continuously including in all rooms)? Maybe you need another dehumidifier? is washing being dried indoors, cooking with lots of steam without extraction?

    Unless there is some external structural cause r water is getting into the walls, you will not get mould with adequate heating and moisture control. A humidity of 60% is quite high by the way - how much water is being pulled out of the air every day?

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      #3
      Originally posted by AndrewDod View Post
      Unless there is some external structural cause water is getting into the walls
      You need to check gutters,drains and possibly chimney flashings

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        #4
        Buy a dehumidifier. Ebac do the best ones and use it.



        Freedom at the point of zero............

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          #5
          Mould is a difficult issue to neutralise. Currently outside air humidity is very high 85-95% so allowing unheated/wet air into a property does not make the issue go away. As a guide properties should be between 35-50% humidity. Thus dehumidifiers are a good way of drying the air. Open fires are without doubt the best way as during the burning process water is 'combusted' and sent on its way, and they are as cheap as chips to run. That said the fact that you have damp low down in the property suggests something else. Obviously heat rises so you could presume that the walls are warmer at the top of the room which is where you find the warmest wettest air. This should be vented, but you say that you have air bricks fitted (assume that they are high up). You however,may need to vent more by way of a continuously running (silent) extractor fan. More heating will be required of course.
          Re: the low level mould...is your house an old one with solid walls? Is there an effective damp course? Has the property been rendered? Are there lots of air bricks under the damp course layer? All of these can cause problems due to the cold lower parts of the wall meeting warmer upper parts causing condensation.

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            #6
            I had a problem with mould growing on walls where condensation was collecting behind furniture due to cold outside walls in a student house. I painted these with bathroom paint and the problem was solved!

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              #7
              I also put Killrock Damp traps in the rooms to remove excess moisture - a cheap way to dehumidify.

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