Repair (reasonable time)

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    #16
    Originally posted by jpkeates View Post
    That's not true.
    Does make you wonder what else theyhave wrong and how much hassle they cause tenant and landlord alike!

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      #17
      The fault was low pressure which has now been rectified. She said she was withholding the rent until the problem was rectified and thought that we should have given even more of a reduction. We will not be issuing a S.21 at this stage but will not be rolling on at the end of six month tenancy. We're probably going to try and sell as the hassle we get is not worth it.

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        #18
        Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
        She said she was withholding the rent until the problem was rectified
        Never been in that position as I clearly explain reasonable repair times right from the beginnings and don’t let to unreasonable people but would not tolerate such an ultimatum.

        Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
        and thought that we should have given even more of a reduction.
        Nor that.

        Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
        We will not be issuing a S.21 at this stage but will not be rolling on at the end of six month tenancy.
        You probably need to research that one quite a bit.

        Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
        We're probably going to try and sell as the hassle we get is not worth it.
        Might be for the best, it can get a lot worse than this.



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          #19
          The tenancy will roll on at the end of the six months. You can't stop that happening unless the tenant leaves voluntarily or agrees to something else. You can truncate the time for which it rolls on, but only by issuing section 21.

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            #20
            "Never been in that position as I clearly explain reasonable repair times right from the beginnings and don’t let to unreasonable people but would not tolerate such an ultimatum."

            Well therein lies the rub - you can never tell whether people are going to become 'unreasonable'. They start off as reasonable people, they are keen to rent the flat and provide all the appropriate references etc. What do you say to them - will you become unreasonable the moment you have your foot through the door?

            Can I just ask one more thing - what do you mean about us researching the fact that we won't be renewing the tenancy after the six months?

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              #21
              Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
              What do you say to them - will you become unreasonable the moment you have your foot through the door?
              Can I just ask one more thing - what do you mean about us researching the fact that we won't be renewing the tenancy after the six months?
              See my post at #19.

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                #22

                Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
                Well therein lies the rub - you can never tell whether people are going to become 'unreasonable'. They start off as reasonable people, they are keen to rent the flat and provide all the appropriate references etc. What do you say to them - will you become unreasonable the moment you have your foot through the door?

                There's quite a lot to that but one of the things I specifically discuss is repair reporting, urgency and timescales.

                I had an uncannily similar conversation to your situation with new prospective tenants last month. I spelt it out that with an urgent repair such as a boiler breaking down I'd usually get a plumber round the next working day, so if it inevitably happens on a Friday night, that means Monday morning. Unless it is the busiest time of year for plumbers such as the first autumn cold snap when it might even be the following working day to that.
                (I also tell them to check and fully run up the heating system before it gets cold, as any sensible owner would do.)

                I'm specifically looking out for know-your-rights types coming out with unreasonable nonsense like repairs have to be done within 24 hours. Even more so now!

                Two of the referencing questions to previous landlords your tenants would presumably now fail are;
                "Was the rent paid on time, every time?"
                "Would you let to these people again?"

                I'd also be going ballistic about their first action after reporting a fault is to cancel their standing order for the rent. And I certainly wouldn't even have mentioned compo at this stage.

                But I do sympathise and it is not easy filtering out unreasonable tenants, thank goodness for section 21!

                Talking of which, leaseholder64 has admirably answered your other question but I do think you should do a lot more research on it.


                Edit: Double post, deleted/flagged as spam.

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                  #23
                  Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
                  The fault was low pressure
                  This is something that could have been solved by the tenant. When the tenant reported the fault you can ask them to look at the water pressure on the boiler and if below 1.5 bar ( at which point the boiler automatically shuts down)top up with the cold water feed. Some systems are prone to this happening and it is best to try and learn how to restore the heating ASAP. I only learnt this through trial and error and talking to the heating engineer.

                  This whole experience seems to have been a shock for you and Boletus is quite correct in saying that it can get a lot worse than this.



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                    #24
                    I'd say it was something that could have been fixed by some landlords. Getting this right is not something that I would want to delegate t the average man in the street, even though it is treated as user serviceable item.

                    If you have to do it a lot, you will be diluting the corrosion inhibitor, so you don't want it to be being done without your knowledge.

                    The filling loops are supposed to be disconnected when not in use, but most people won't do this.

                    People can leave the filling tap on, and ignore the water coming out of the pressure relief valve, which will quickly dilute the inhibitor.

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                      #25
                      We have rented out this property for the last 14 years so do know about the various types you can meet. It was just wanting to have verification about the legal requirements to get repairs done as she was citing 24 hours and saying her mum works for the council and is familiar with the L&T act. It was just a very stressful weekend.

                      We arranged to go to the property on Saturday but she wasn't there - otherwise we could have probably sorted it without the £142 bill.

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                        #26
                        Originally posted by Notrigsby View Post
                        Firstly, can I say that there is very little advice out there for landlords, loads for tenants so they can be protected. Very little to protect small, private landlords who are trying to do the right thing but are constantly being ripped off.
                        ................
                        Umm errr... no. There is LOADS of advice - RLA, NLA, Shelter, CaB, Accreditation organisations, Shelter Legal, gov.uk.... etc etc etc etc. Not to mention the various forums (so sorry you have that view of places like this..).

                        What training have you done or books read on how to be a landlord, please, and what qualifications/accreditations gained?

                        When I started as a landlord I thought I knew what I was doing: No training, no books, just arrogant stupidity: Made expensive, painful, long-drawn out mistakes. Vowed to learn. Been learning, still learning, still making mistakes.

                        Cheers!
                        I am legally unqualified: If you need to rely on advice check it with a suitable authority - eg a solicitor specialising in landlord/tenant law...

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                          #27
                          Well I'm not quite sure how to take your message theartfullodger. When I said about not much advice for landlords, if you put a question into Google the answers you receive are mostly fro the tenants' point of view even if you specify landlord.

                          I thank those that have provided the information that I requested on here but am a bit taken aback at the slightly aggressive way in which you have worded yours. I do not have to tell you what qualifications I have to be a landlord and as stated have been one for 14 years. As you say still learning and still making mistakes!

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                            #28
                            Checking the pressure in the central heating is a tenant like thing to do.

                            I'd put a note in my diary for next September to text the tenant at the time to remind them to check that and maybe the gutters.
                            When I post, I am expressing an opinion - feel free to disagree, I have been wrong before.
                            Please don't act on my suggestions without checking with a grown-up (ideally some kind of expert).

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