Paint won't stick to plasterboard joints

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    Paint won't stick to plasterboard joints

    Re-decorating a new flat for the first time is proving difficult:

    The old emulsion is 'rolling up' on my roller when I find a plasterboard joint. I then have to stop work, and try to fill the jagged hole with filler, and delay finishing a further day. My uncle suggested painting the whole place with exterior stabilising solution, but that seems rather expensive, and a lot of work.

    Any ideas?

    #2
    Have you considered taping the joints? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iFEi50yaqRo

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      #3
      Not sure I understand. Presumably they were taped when the place was built.

      Comment


        #4
        Indoor paint sprayer? At least you won't be pulling the old paint off with a roller.

        They can be a bit tricky though and you have to mask carefully to avoid overspray.

        My LL used one recently and it did a decent job on pretty large plasterboard walls.

        https://paintsprayermag.com/best-indoor-paint-sprayers/

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          #5
          [QUOTE=JK0;n1060

          I then have to stop work, and try to fill the jagged hole with filler[/QUOTE]

          Do you mean that a hole appears where a plasterboard screw or nail was previously because the roller action and stickiness of the paint has pulled it off? If so yes I have come across this - try thinning the emulusion slightly or painting the joint lines carefully with a brush and rollering after. Yes it is all time!




          Freedom at the point of zero............

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            #6
            Originally posted by Interlaken View Post

            Do you mean that a hole appears where a plasterboard screw or nail was previously because the roller action and stickiness of the paint has pulled it off? If so yes I have come across this - try thinning the emulusion slightly or painting the joint lines carefully with a brush and rollering after. Yes it is all time!
            Thanks Interlaken. No, not just where a screw or nail was. I get a jagged vertical strip of paint maybe 2" wide unrolling where the joint compound is.

            I think maybe Nukecad is onto something when he mentions spraying. I think the whole place must have been sprayed, as it's all white, and presumably there was no problem with the joints previously.

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              #7
              My LL took up the carpet (we were getting a new one anyway), masked off the window glass, the fire surround, the radiator, the electrical sockets and switches.
              And then just sprayed everything else white - including the skirtings, door, and window frames.

              It was a decent job overall, but I did have to scrape spotting off the glass and clean the brass fittings once it had dried.

              Pity the back wall was/is damp and showed through the new paint after a week or two. rofl.gif

              Comment


                #8
                Originally posted by JK0 View Post
                Not sure I understand. Presumably they were taped when the place was built.
                Possibly- depends how good a job they did. Sounds like if it was done it wasnt done properly as you shouldnt be getting jagged holes if it was taped, sounds more like poor quality filler.

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                  #9
                  I've taken a picture to show you what I'm encountering. This latest bit lifted below the bit I patched up on Saturday when I tried to repaint the wall:

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That doesnt look like a join,looks more like the surface of the plasterboard is tearing off and possibly the paint not holding because there is a damp problem. But that's beyond my knowledge level.However if you find a forum for plasterers and ask their advice they may be willing to tell you what the problem is and what a trade would charge to fix it.

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                      #11
                      On looking at the picture it appears that someone has painted straight onto the plasterboard whereas I thought usually the plasterboard has a plaster skim over it , and then the plaster is painted. I would ask the builder, previous owner or even the plasterboard supplier for their take on the situation.

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                        #12
                        Thanks Alex. Oh, well the place is 17 years old, and I've had it for 11 years. Just the first time I've got round to painting it.

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                          #13
                          What skinflint developers allowing that - agree the skim coat is missing. What about papering with lining paper all the walls or those worst affected? Hell - what a job



                          Freedom at the point of zero............

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Strip back, seize the boards, paper, paint.

                            Big job, but at least from the look of things you'll have no problem stripping the old stuff off.

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