Improving EPC

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    Improving EPC

    I am in the process of buying an old terraced house with the intention of renting it out.
    The EPC is dreadful "G" which means I cant rent it out until its improved.
    I could do with suggestions as to how to improve the EPC.
    Although I believe that the loft has since had insulation that only takes it to an "F" according to the EPC

    I may not be able to de Cavity Wall Insulation as the property is perhaps 100 years old and the walls may not have a cavity.

    The house has a cellar so I may be able to insulate the floor from underneath.

    In addition as the house has high ceilings I may be able to put Insulation on top of the existing floor with new floorboards on top, or with this am I wasting my time.

    I know an identical house two doors away has a EPC of "D" so it must be achievable.

    I believe if I go in the loft I can see the underneath of the tiles, I could insulate between the rafters etc.

    Any advice gratefully received.

    Thanks

    #2
    You should be aware that EPC assessors are awkward about recognising improvements that they can't see.

    Thus loft insulation is a good idea, as is a new boiler & energy saving bulbs. Maybe ask neighbour what they had done, and who their assessor is.

    Comment


      #3
      Originally posted by Always Problems View Post
      I could do with suggestions as to how to improve the EPC...............

      I know an identical house two doors away has a EPC of "D" so it must be achievable.

      Thanks
      I have a corner terraced house with 3 outside walls. The house was damp with mould on some walls and tenants were complaining of the cold. It was rated as an F. I decided to upgrade the house

      I undertook a comprehensive insulation upgrade and refit which included insulated plasterboard on outside walls, Celotex insulation in attic room, underfloor insulation to ground floor. I installed a new condensing boiler, new radiators and it had full double glazed units.
      The EPC was a computerised tick box exercise - low energy light bulbs - tick, thermostatic radiator valves - tick etc. I persuaded the assessor to accept that I had installed insulation by asking the builder to write and confirm insulation installed and passed information to assessor.
      The EPC moved to a D and I was surprised that it wasn't higher and so I phoned the EPC directly and spoke to an evaluator who said that it is basically a computer programme which decides the rating and that the absolute maximum I could expect for an old house with 3 outside walls would be a C.

      I agree with JKO and by following his advice you should get up to a D at far less a cost than I spent. Fixing the chimney flashings and gutters have a massive impact if the house is damp but does not reflect in the EPC.

      Comment


        #4
        I'm a big user of Celertex on external walls, re-board, plaster and replace skirtings. Yes it is not cheap but tenants do tend to stay put as the bills are low. If you have a cellar then insulating under the above floor is a must. Take pics as you go and have them ready for the assessor to see and for future use.



        Freedom at the point of zero............

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          #5
          I took pictures of insulation at the previous flat I renovated. EPC assessor was still unwilling to take them into account.

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            #6
            Originally posted by JK0 View Post
            I took pictures of insulation at the previous flat I renovated. EPC assessor was still unwilling to take them into account.
            I've never found that JKO and used a few different ones now.



            Freedom at the point of zero............

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              #7
              EPC Surveyors must work to a fixed list which gives the points achieved when they see certain features on the inside of buildings, where could one get a copy of the list to compare what a particular property has and see what one can do to improve it.

              Comment


                #8
                I attended an NEA meeting the other day where they were talking about pushing for the date to be brought forward to 2025 for the EPC 'C' rating to come into effect. My advice do more now so that you don't have to upgrade later once you have tenants in situ. Nearly all houses can be brought to a 'C' rating.

                A few points: first you can apply for an exemption at the moment once you have spent £3,000 on upgrading the property. This usually means that you have replaced a gas boiler with a modern 'A' rated one. This figure will rise of course!!! The NEA are demanding it be raised to £3,500 as a minimum for 2020, then presumably it will rise again, probably exponentially!

                EPCs consist of a complex calculation but in essence are: the thermal barrier (walls, loft or roof, floors, doors and windows), heating appliances: (gasoil/biomass boilers, electric: heatpumps, electric coil, IR panels, night storage etc) and then the (green stuff as I call it) energy smart meters, energy supply, (solar/themal PV, wind turbines, donkey wheels etc, etc). So you would be wasting your money on insulation over floors. Insulate only the exterior frame of the building.

                To increase the EPC rating think 'Fabric First' so draughts, walls, windows and doors, loft insulation underfloor insulation. The next is the heating source and then the 'green stuff'. Without the 'green stuff' you will unlikely be able to get to an EPC 'B' rating but a 'C' rating is sufficient.

                The main thing to remember is that you need proof of upgrading works as the EPC assessment is 'non-invasionary' meaning they cannot dig into stuff so photos should do the trick to prove the work has been done.

                Potential problems: any upgrading works to older properties carry risk to the structure of the building eg any External Wall Insulation can lead to eg a greater fire risk or cold-bridging meaning damp problems, rotting of timbers etc. The tenants behaviour may have to change as a better thermally efficient house needs more ventilation and also the contractors you engage may be 'experts' but actually clueless.

                Good luck!!

                Comment


                  #9
                  Originally posted by SimonRW View Post
                  My advice do more now so that you don't have to upgrade later once you have tenants in situ. Nearly all houses can be brought to a 'C' rating. [/FONT][/COLOR][/LEFT]
                  Why would you need to do that? You'll have at least two years notice of any changes.

                  Comment


                    #10
                    That may be true but my second sentence qualifies my response; '
                    My advice do more now so that you don't have to upgrade later once you have tenants in situ.'

                    Comment


                      #11
                      The single most cost effective thing you can do is insulate the loft (between the joists), if it is not already insulated. It would be unusual to only go from a G to an F if you do this (maybe from the bottom of a G to near the top of an F?), but as I know nothing else about your property I can't say for sure. The first 100mm of insulation tends to do around 95+% of the insulating, so if you're on a budget that'll do a lot for very little cash, so start there.

                      Comment


                        #12
                        couldn't you ask the epc assessor to attend at various stages to see works in progress and then do a final assessment? the assessor will have seen the 'improvements'

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                          #13
                          Originally posted by MisterB View Post
                          couldn't you ask the epc assessor to attend at various stages to see works in progress and then do a final assessment? the assessor will have seen the 'improvements'
                          The lady said that I 'might have removed the insulation' after she's seen it. With that sort of attitude, I can't be bothered with this whole farce.

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Quick question: I have 2 old farm cottages (England) that are prone to lifestyle damp since they’ve had double glazing (no window vents) as some tenants are unwilling to ventilate adequately. I’m mulling over some renovation work when a property is vacant and am considering a PIV system and retrofitting vents to the double glazed window frames. We are in a very windy position on top of a hill. Window vents/ PIV will make the place colder. Will that affect the EPC or is it outside the scope of the EPC? Thanks

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Originally posted by JK0 View Post

                              The lady said that I 'might have removed the insulation' after she's seen it. With that sort of attitude, I can't be bothered with this whole farce.
                              Doing things temporarily to get through inspections is quite common (even though illegal) in fire safety, so there is at least some reason to be suspicious. On the other hand, I can see that removing closers and fire doors makes things more convenient for the occupier, but I can't see how removing insulation makes sense.

                              Comment

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