Seller not complied with legal requirements

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    Seller not complied with legal requirements

    Hi, I am in the process of buying a mixed use commercial property, where the vendor does not appear to have complied with the Fire Safety or disability access regulations, and letting out a flat below the minimum EPC rating due to no gas central heating boiler.

    As part of the buying process, is it their responsibility to bring the property up to the required standard before completing? Or will these items, now that I am aware of them, become my responsibility after completion, and so can reduce the purchase price by the amount needed to bring the property into line with legal requirements.

    Any advice much appreciated

    #2
    I think I know why the guy's selling, don't I?

    Yes, will be up to you after completion.

    Comment


      #3
      If you have exchanged contracts please be tactful in how you proceed with your discussions as you are in a slightly compromised position.

      If you have not exchanged, good luck in your negotiations and reducing the purchase price. The sellers initial reaction may determine how far you want to drive down the price - ie if they claim complete ignorance you may want to push harder, if there is acknowledgement of some concerns they are likely to argue that the original asking price was reflective of some of the 'defects'.

      Comment


        #4
        Unless the seller has misrepresented anything, it's caveat emptor.

        Comment

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